western medicine – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 18:53:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.kundalini-support.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-favicon-4-32x32.png western medicine – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ 32 32 Traditional Chinese medicine pushes digital boundaries http://www.kundalini-support.com/traditional-chinese-medicine-pushes-digital-boundaries/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/traditional-chinese-medicine-pushes-digital-boundaries/ Used in China for thousands of years, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is pushing digital boundaries to improve accuracy and accessibility with increasingly sophisticated and accessible treatments that are driving demand. High-tech TCM solution providers are enhancing their offerings by integrating artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR), and augmented reality (AR). The so-called fourth industrial revolution […]]]>

Used in China for thousands of years, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is pushing digital boundaries to improve accuracy and accessibility with increasingly sophisticated and accessible treatments that are driving demand. High-tech TCM solution providers are enhancing their offerings by integrating artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR), and augmented reality (AR).

The so-called fourth industrial revolution is in full swing, bringing with it both challenges and opportunities. This digital transformation is having a massive impact on the healthcare sector, disrupting business models, services, regulations and the demand for skills. In China, home to a creaky healthcare system and an aging population, the government is turning to new technologies to drive a shift from disease-centered care to what is known as “big health”. Focusing on prevention rather than cure, this healthy living initiative will provide a full suite of smart, personalized services to citizens to span the full continuum of care.

Big Health seeks to combine traditional remedies, Western medicine and wellness regimens into a national holistic program. Thus, the demand for traditional Chinese medicine is on the rise, with the global market leading grow more than 5% per year by 2030. Sofya Bakhta, analyst at a China-based market research and advisory firm Daxue Consultingnoted:

“With their growing awareness of health and wellness issues, an increasing number of Chinese people are now seeking good quality TCM treatments. As TCM increasingly intersects with cutting-edge digital technology, these treatments are becoming more sophisticated and accessible, further driving demand. »

Facial acupuncture is administered to a patient in Beijing. (Credit: Justin Jin/Panos)

Something old, something new

As one of the oldest health and wellness systems, TCM has been used in China for thousands of years. While other medical regimens prioritize treating disease, TCM aims to increase immunity and improve well-being. TCM practitioners typically diagnose a patient’s condition by observing, listening, asking, and feeling – they then use a variety of natural products to improve overall health, ease pain, and treat ailments. The most common types of traditional Chinese medicine include herbal remedies, acupuncture, and Tai Chi.

The emergence of new technologies such as big data, artificial intelligence, virtual reality and augmented reality means that the diagnostic methods generally used in TCM are now simulated, extended and even replaced. Supported by the rapid development of Chinese mobile health (mHealth) applications and given additional impetus by Covid-19this means that China is now at the forefront of cutting-edge TCM-based healthcare.

(Credit: 3D Visual Acupuncture)
(Credit: 3D Visual Acupuncture)

The rapid growth in mobile phone usage, internet connectivity and digital health technologies means that China’s mobile health market is currently booming. The market contains a growing number of applications for TCM practitioners, with the majority focused on acupuncture and herbs.

Acupuncture involves the insertion of very fine needles through the skin at strategic points on the body. It is a key component of TCM and is most often used to treat pain, although it is increasingly being used for general well-being, including stress management. A growing number of smartphone apps, such as Acupressure point for over 300 diseases, 3D Visual Acupuncture, Acupuncture index and Acurhythmhelp users identify the body’s acupuncture points (places where nerves, muscles and connective tissue can be stimulated) and the meridians (lines) that connect them.

Wouter van Vugt, founder of Visual Acupuncture 3D, explained:

“In books and pictures, it is difficult to understand how the meridians flow from the front of the body to the back, and how they pass through different organs. My three-dimensional app allows for a much better visual understanding of how different points relate to each other and to anatomical landmarks.

AcuMap (Credit: MAI)

TCM mobile apps are not limited to acupuncture. Bencaofor example, provides users with a wealth of information about herbs and how they can be used to treat specific symptoms. Help at the TCM clinic is a one-stop-shop for TCM practitioners, with acupuncture point locations, herb information, and the ability for the user to test their knowledge.

Next Generation Technology

However, the technology related to acupuncture does not stop at simple screen visualization. Acupuncture AR claims to be the world’s first AR-based app for acupuncture, acupressure, and moxibustion (a TCM therapy that involves burning dried mugwort on particular points on the body). It uses AR to help users locate and view acupuncture points (currently 170) on the body live through the smartphone camera.

AcuMap from FRIEND (Medical Augmented Intelligence) goes even further by integrating VR into its acupuncture solution. Using AcuMap software and a VR headset, acupuncturists and students can meet virtually to hone their skills and exchange clinical decisions, all from the comfort of their homes.

MAI CEO Sam Jang said:

“AcuMap is designed to go beyond current acupuncture training and simulation with its comprehensive, medically accurate 3D mapping of the human body. Based on increasingly affordable headsets, we want to build a scalable virtual world so that everyone can receive medical training and improve their skills.

Improved AI

Other high-tech TCM solution providers are improving their offerings by integrating AI. the XunAi The app, which was developed by Shenzhen-based Aiaitie, diagnoses users’ health by using AI to analyze photos of the tongue, face, hands or other body parts, then recommending TCM-related therapies (tongue diagnosis has played a central role in TCM for thousands of years and a growing number of companies are working on related AI-based systems).

XunAi Founder Ellen Ony said:

“The most innovative aspect of the app is that it removes the need for doctors. In less than two minutes, the AI-based system offers a health check and an associated way to improve health, which could be related to diet, music, acupuncture or moxibustion.Multiple technologies are involved, such as deep learning, advanced visual recognition and attitude positioning.

Based in Vancouver WisdomAIC also integrates AI into the four diagnostic methods of TCM (looking, listening, smelling, asking and touching) using image recognition, speech processing and machine learning. The system has been deployed in over 1,000 medical institutions and is currently being tested to improve the accuracy and efficiency of TCM diagnosis and treatment.

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More Zimbabweans are turning to traditional Chinese medicine as an alternative treatment http://www.kundalini-support.com/more-zimbabweans-are-turning-to-traditional-chinese-medicine-as-an-alternative-treatment/ Sat, 06 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/more-zimbabweans-are-turning-to-traditional-chinese-medicine-as-an-alternative-treatment/ The Chronicle XINHUA – After receiving his second and final acupuncture treatment, Sebastian Jackson (53) smiled as he showed everyone how powerful his take had become. Just over a week ago, he could barely shake someone’s hand without wincing in pain. “It works! The first time I came here I was in pain and couldn’t […]]]>


The Chronicle

XINHUA – After receiving his second and final acupuncture treatment, Sebastian Jackson (53) smiled as he showed everyone how powerful his take had become. Just over a week ago, he could barely shake someone’s hand without wincing in pain.

“It works! The first time I came here I was in pain and couldn’t shake anyone’s hand, but now as you can feel my grip is very powerful,” he said triumphantly. .

Jackson told Xinhua that he had had his wrists treated at conventional medical centers but had not found any luck.

Then he heard about the Zimbabwe-China Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture Center of Parirenyatwa Hospital Group, where the treatment of illnesses could be done using acupuncture. He decided to give it a try.

The treatment worked for Jackson, one of the thousands of Zimbabweans who have turned to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for their illnesses.

The center was designated by the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare in January 2020, following the signing of a memorandum of understanding between the Zimbabwean and Chinese governments on cooperation in the field of TCM and acupuncture.

The facility, which will also house the country’s largest TCM training school and research center, began welcoming patients in November 2020.

As of April of this year, he had treated more than 150 people with various ailments such as hypertension, lower back pain, diabetes, hernia and other health issues.

The centre’s executive director Sun Shuang said 48% of patients were now locals, compared to when it was opened when most Chinese nationals sought treatment there.

“We accept patients with urgent and urgent problems when there is no other option for them. We do not advertise. We have a lot of patients just because of the good results on our other patients, ”she said.

The doctor said the center is training more local doctors in traditional medicine, hoping that over time more similar facilities will be opened across the country.

Karen Gurure, a Zimbabwean doctor trained in China and interned at the clinic, told Xinhua that the main benefit of TCM is that it has fewer side effects.

Gurure, who had studied at the Chinese University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Jiangxi, said that adopting TCM, which uses complex imbalance patterns in the body to determine a diagnosis, said Western medicine tends to focus on the diagnosis and treatment of disease. depending on a patient’s symptoms.

“TCM focuses on the whole body, while conventional medicine focuses on a certain part of the body. If you have back pain, conventional medicine would treat you only for back pain, with TCM it treats the whole body, ”she said.

Gurure said China was offering valuable lessons to Zimbabwe in terms of modernizing and codifying traditional medicine.

Zimbabwe has a long history of using traditional herbal remedies, which remain the most affordable and readily available source of treatment for many people.

Recognized as officially part of the country’s health system, traditional remedies still remain a largely untapped health resource due to a lack of comprehensive research, Gurure said.

Sun said the center was ready to help Zimbabwean health professionals learn about their traditional medicine so they can provide better services to their patients.

For her, the experience of each patient is memorable. “Every patient who comes here would love to be back,” she said.


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How Traditional Chinese Medicine Can Improve Health http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-traditional-chinese-medicine-can-improve-health/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-traditional-chinese-medicine-can-improve-health/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 20:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-traditional-chinese-medicine-can-improve-health/ As the popular saying goes, prevention is better than cure – and it’s a philosophy that figures prominently in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The same is true of the principle of self-care – or “Yang Sheng”. “Unlike Western medicine, which focuses on solving health problems, Chinese medicine focuses on prevention along with healing,” says Katie […]]]>


As the popular saying goes, prevention is better than cure – and it’s a philosophy that figures prominently in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The same is true of the principle of self-care – or “Yang Sheng”.

“Unlike Western medicine, which focuses on solving health problems, Chinese medicine focuses on prevention along with healing,” says Katie Brindle, author of Yang Sheng: The Art Of Chinese Self-Healing .

“For example, in Chinese medicine, a poor night’s sleep or thinning hair means the start of a deeper health problem. The principle of Chinese medicine is that if you eliminate small health problems as they arise, you will prevent the bigger ones from happening.

Brindle trained to be a Chinese medicine practitioner after helping her recover from injuries sustained in a car accident.

She says self-care is an important part of this approach to wellness, which involves discovering energy imbalances long before they turn into physical symptoms. “The theory is that you are preventing the imbalance from gaining a foothold in the body and turning into something more serious. Think of it as the way we treat our dental care – we brush our teeth every day to prevent plaque from building up and becoming a problem. “

Energy, flow and balance

Brindle says there are three fundamental principles of the holistic mind-body approach of Chinese medicine. These are: ensuring the free flow of qi (energy) and blood circulation (good circulation is considered a foundation of health); purge and nourish (if the toxicity persists in the body, it causes qi to stagnate, which can eventually lead to physical symptoms and illnesses, so you are working to flush out what you don’t need and nourish the body for it. strengthen), and strengthen the five key organs (Chinese medicine says that poor health will always be linked to one of the five key organs – the liver, heart, spleen, lungs and kidneys – so they must all be balanced).

Brindle thinks Chinese medicine is “good for everything,” but says it works especially well for gynecological and fertility issues, and skin problems. “Depending on the person and the problem, sometimes it’s an instant fix and sometimes it’s a smooth process that unfolds over time,” she says.

And while she is a strong advocate for this approach to supporting your health and well-being, she isn’t suggesting that anyone stop seeing their GP. It is always important to have any symptoms or health problems examined by your GP.

“You should always see a Western GP for everything,” Brindle points out. “In an ideal world, Western and Eastern medicine would work in symbiosis, because they work very well together. “

Here are some of the ways Brindle says Chinese medicine can help support health and wellness …

1. Stress relief through breathing

Brindle says the parasympathetic nervous system, which can help restore calm when you’re stressed, can be indirectly stimulated with the right breathing technique, calming the mind and heartbeat, deeply oxygenating the blood, and overriding emotional negativity.

“Breathing is the antidote to stress,” Brindle says. “Doing slowly and mindfully, deep breathing will also affect the nervous system to relieve stress and anxiety, by triggering the release of neurohormones that inhibit stress-producing hormones and cause relaxation.”

2. Boost your energy by tapping

The ancient Chinese therapy of “Pai Sha,” or tapping with bamboo, can “work wonders” for general well-being, Brindle says. Because proper circulation of qi and blood is a fundamental part of health in Chinese medicine, she explains, when the flow is disturbed or stagnates – due to a sedentary lifestyle, stress, emotional disturbances or injuries – this can lead to various symptoms, including body aches. and aches and pains, atrophy and weakness, lack of energy, skin problems, poor sleep, slow metabolism, lack of coordination and digestive problems.

“Patting the skin daily allows free flow of this very important circulation,” explains Brindle. “In as little as a minute a day, a whole body tap can clear areas of stagnation, promote lymphatic drainage, release tension, and promote smooth circulation of blood and qi throughout the body.”

3. Reduce inflammation and improve sleep through self-massage

The ancient self-massage technique of ‘Gua Sha’ uses a tool with rounded edges to press on the skin. It’s said to be beneficial for inflammation, muscle tension, sleep problems, coughs, and fever, according to Brindle, who says the technique improves microcirculation, helps release beneficial antioxidants and enzymes, and stimulates the circulation of qi and lymphatic drainage.

“Gently encouraging the movement of lymph fluid, which cannot drain on its own, is great for reducing puffiness and congestion and helping the body remove excess waste,” says Brindle. “You can do it anywhere and anytime, through your clothes or directly on the skin, using oil as a lubricant.”

4. Improve overall health with gentle Qigong movements

Qigong – which means “practice of the life force” – involves slow, gentle, and thoughtful movements, combined with breathing and mental engagement.

Qigong fans often believe that it can provide a multitude of general health and wellness benefits. The theory is that Qigong works the muscles and nourishes the organs, but most importantly, it does not tire them – therefore it stimulates oxygen uptake and circulation while the body is relaxed.

“By building your life force on the inside, you’ll see results on the outside,” Brindle explains. “If you are tired, low on energy, in poor shape or just simply out of shape, Qigong is for you. As you do the exercises, you balance the whole body. Just because it’s gentle, don’t underestimate its potency and effectiveness.

Always consult your doctor

While complementary therapies and TCM may be something you want to explore, remember that it’s always best to have your GP checked for any symptoms or health concerns.


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Introducing Traditional Chinese Medicine into Western Health Care http://www.kundalini-support.com/introducing-traditional-chinese-medicine-into-western-health-care/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/introducing-traditional-chinese-medicine-into-western-health-care/ If Tom Cruise were to make a movie with Jackie Chan, we would vote to call it “Mission Possible”. When the remarkable abilities of the West and the East are combined, it creates a powerful duo that can defeat anything that causes big trouble, especially when it comes to your health and well-being. The commitment […]]]>


If Tom Cruise were to make a movie with Jackie Chan, we would vote to call it “Mission Possible”. When the remarkable abilities of the West and the East are combined, it creates a powerful duo that can defeat anything that causes big trouble, especially when it comes to your health and well-being.

The commitment to bring the life-enhancing combination of Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine to as many of you as possible has led Dr. Oz to partner with Dr. Anlong Xu, President of Beijing Chinese Medicine University. and editor. from the Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences. Their new book “Yin Yang You” takes you into the sometimes mysterious world of TCM and offers practical ideas and advice that will broaden your horizons and improve your health.

So, let’s take a quick tour of TCM and find out what it can do for you, on its own or in combination with Western medicine. After all, it’s not one or the other. It’s pretty much with. It is the balance that characterizes the yin / yang.

Is the TCM up to date? Although TCM is based on centuries (heck, millennia) of ancient ideas, the therapies are not outdated. TCM remedies and techniques often provide straightforward solutions to 21st century health issues such as fatigue, gastrointestinal upset, depression / anxiety, blood sugar imbalance, sleep disturbances, obesity, and cardiovascular problems. TCM also addresses quality of life issues, such as pain management, achieving holistic balance, and longevity. Take the practice of acupuncture and TCM acupressure, for example. Stimulating targeted points with acu needles along meridians where your vital energy (qi) flows – or gets stuck – can improve many health issues. You can even use TCM pressure points at home for headache and anxiety relief.

Why does western medicine have an interest in partnering with TCM? Western medicine has given us incredible advancements in everything from diagnostic machines and antibiotics, to cutting-edge research and the wow-oh-wow possibilities to extend longevity. We are living longer and better thanks to these modern innovations. Yet Western medicine is often more effective at treating disease than preventing it. Case in point: A recent Harris poll found that only 17% of Americans say they are in excellent health. But that could change drastically if people integrate East and West in their quest for a positive quality of life.

Should you try TCM?

1. Yes, if you want to prevent ill health and avoid common chronic diseases and conditions – and Western treatments for them. TCM is especially beneficial if you are at high risk for an inherited disease, live in an industrial pollution area, have a sedentary lifestyle, or have a diet packed with ultra-processed fast food. It offers a combination of improved lifestyle choices in nutrition and physical activity, as well as ways to change your outlook using treatments that affect your mind, emotions, and balance.

2. Yes, if you have a “gray” symptom. Feeling out of balance and a little worried about your health, but not sure what’s going on? If you have symptoms that make you feel “not quite right,” TCM is worth a look.

3. Yes, if Western medicine isn’t working as well as you expected. TCM can solve very tangible and acute problems, whether you have a rash, a headache, or high blood pressure.

4. Yes, if you have a DIY philosophy on health care. While you need Western healthcare professionals for many treatments – from life-saving stents to cancer treatments and surgery – there are many things you can and should do on your own to recover or maintain your health. TCM gives you many possibilities to do this, using herbal remedies and physical treatments.

If these concepts have piqued your curiosity about TCM and you want to learn more about it, check out a copy of “Yin Yang You, Biohacking with Ancient Codes”. You can try their home remedies and recipes and see what a TCM practitioner can do for you. Then improving health and well-being will become your possible mission!

Mehmet Oz, MD is the host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen, MD is Director of Wellness Emeritus at the Cleveland Clinic. To live your best, tune into “The Dr. Oz Show” or visit sharecare.com.

(c) 2021 Michael Roizen, MD

and Mehmet Oz, MD

Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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Cold and flu treatments from traditional Chinese medicine http://www.kundalini-support.com/cold-and-flu-treatments-from-traditional-chinese-medicine/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/cold-and-flu-treatments-from-traditional-chinese-medicine/ As the weather dips into lower temperatures, we are entering yet another cold and flu season. This is the time of year when the chances of “falling with something” increase. If you end up with a cold or the flu, you can take a proactive approach to help your body recover as quickly as possible. […]]]>


As the weather dips into lower temperatures, we are entering yet another cold and flu season. This is the time of year when the chances of “falling with something” increase.

If you end up with a cold or the flu, you can take a proactive approach to help your body recover as quickly as possible.

While there is currently no cure for a cold or the flu, just letting your illness run for about 10 days is not the only option.

For starters, getting the flu shot can go a long way in prevention. On top of that, you can boost your immunity even further to potentially avoid catching anything in the first place.

If you do end up getting sick, there are ways to reduce the severity of your symptoms and speed up your recovery.

One way to do this is to use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) remedies which can stimulate your body’s natural healing abilities.

TCM is a type of traditional medicine system that originated in China. It is a comprehensive toolkit of complementary practices, including:

TCM’s philosophy is generally based on Chinese concepts of:

  • qi, the vital energy supposed to guide physical and mental processes
  • yin and yang, the opposite energies of life
  • Wu Xing, or the theory of the five elements

According to Leng tang ritchie, Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) and Director of Clinical Services at the Pacific College of Health and Science, different factors can lead to colds and flu depending on how the disease presents itself in each person.

“This means that we treat differently depending on whether the patient’s symptoms are mainly in the form of heat, cold or even humidity,” says Tang-Ritchie.

“In Western medicine, we describe it as a cold or the flu,” says Debbie kung, DAOM and certified acupuncturist (LAc).

In TCM, she notes, the perspective focuses on the individual.

“We actually see this as different scenarios,” Kung explains. “It could be a qi issue, a blood issue, or a yin and yang issue – so it’s a little different.”

Strengthening your immune system is the first step in preventing a cold or the flu.

“It’s best to keep your immune system healthy,” advises a doctor of acupuncture and Chinese medicine (DACM) Tom ingegno. “Visiting your TCM practitioner in late summer and early fall can help boost your immune system with herbs and acupuncture that are specifically aimed at keeping you healthy.”

So how do you keep your immune system in tip-top shape?

In addition to prevention, TCM uses herbs and foods to help support your body’s natural healing function.

According to Irina Logman, DACM and owner of the Advanced Holistic Center at Carillon Miami, “Practitioners can identify weak links in the patient’s constitution and prescribe a treatment plan to strengthen that element.”

She suggests getting a personalized blend of herbs based on an evaluation by a licensed professional.

“While the individual herbs are great, the real magic is in the Chinese herbal formulas,” says Logman.

“Chinese herbs and herbalism are basically the backbone of Chinese medicine,” Kung explains. “Herbs are actually the best thing you can do for colds and flu. “

Nonetheless, Kung cautions that there are some important things to keep in mind when taking herbs, such as:

  • only take herbs suggested by a certified TCM practitioner
  • tell your practitioner about any other medicines you are taking or conditions you have
  • take herbs regularly for the prescribed period of time

Board-certified and certified TCM practitioners are required to memorize over 3,000 herbs, dosages, and interactions with other herbs and drugs.

They can tell you:

  • what kind of herbs you might need
  • whether to take them as a capsule, tincture or tea
  • how often you should take them

Taking herbs regularly is the key to getting the best results.

Some common herbal formulations include:

Jade windshield powder

This is a classic herbal blend that has been used in China since the Yu Ping Feng San dynasty, which translates to “jade windshield” in English.

The mixture is a powder mixture of:

It is used to strengthen the immune system and protect the body against viral and bacterial infections.

Reheat herbs like ginger, turmeric, and cinnamon

When you are sick, you can easily make yourself a warming tea with these common cooking herbs.

“When it comes to colds and flu, you want to sweat to get it all out,” Kung explains. “These help warm the body in a way that is not too dangerous. It pushes and makes you sweat and helps warm the body.

Ginger is already known to be antiviral and antibacterial, and it helps reduce nausea. Chop the ginger and soak it in hot water, adding honey or lemon to taste.

Full of antioxidants as well as anti-inflammatory benefits, turmeric can be added to bone broth or taken in pill form.

Like turmeric, cinnamon is also loaded with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. It can help fight bacterial and fungal infections.

You can make cinnamon, Chinese dates, and ginger tea to relieve cold and flu symptoms.

Gui Zhi Tang

You may recognize the ingredients of Gui Zhi Tang:

This mixture is recommended by Tang-Ritchie for a cold or flu that is accompanied by:

“This formula will relieve muscle aches, encourage sweating and act as a decongestant,” she says. “Patients should drink plenty of warm fluids while taking this formula. “

Yin Qiao San

For colds that lean more toward mild fever, chills, and a mild sore throat, Tang-Ritchie suggests the Yin Qiao San herbal formula. He understands:

The formula can help reduce thirst and fever and relieve a sore throat.

“Honeysuckle flowers and forsythia have strong antiviral properties,” says Tang-Ritchie. “Sometimes Yin Qiao San is combined with a more potent antiviral formula called Gan Mao Ling (an effective cold remedy) if the sore throat is more severe.”

Only take herbs prescribed by a certified and licensed TCM practitioner. Even though many of the above ingredients are mild, it’s always best to check with a professional when taking any herbs regularly.

TCM emphasizes holistic well-being and balance, which means that it often involves more than one approach.

The treatments below can help prevent and recover from colds and flu in addition to herbs.

Gua Sha

Gua sha involves repeatedly scratching your skin in a downward motion with a tool after applying an ointment, such as massage oil or balm. It can be done by a TCM practitioner or you can do it at home if your practitioner shows you how.

“Try gua sha on the chest and upper back,” suggests Ingegno.

He notes that while we see many influencers using gua sha tools for facial treatments, one of its real uses is to break up congestion in the lungs.

“By scratching these areas and breaking the surface capillaries, we increase circulation to symptomatic areas and stimulate a healing response, including an increase in white blood cells,” adds Ingegno.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture involves inserting tiny needles into specific points on the skin to stimulate the desired response.

It can calm inflammation caused by cold and flu viruses and help your immune system defend your body by promoting circulation, wound healing, and pain modulation.

suction cups

TCM practitioners can use suction cups to create suction and increase blood flow to an area by placing suction cups on the skin. It can relieve muscle tension and promote repair of cellular and connective tissue.

“Cupping and gua sha in the upper back can help clear chest congestion, reduce symptoms and relieve respiratory discomfort,” says Tang-Ritchie. “We use a combination of these techniques depending on the specifics of each patient’s case.

Moxibustion

The practice of TCM moxibustion involves burning moxa, a cone made from ground sagebrush leaves, either directly on your skin or indirectly on acupuncture needles in your body.

According to a Research report 2018, studies have shown that moxibustion can increase white blood cell count and immunity.

Always make sure that you receive treatments like acupuncture, cupping, gua sha, moxibustion, and herbal remedies from a practitioner who is licensed professionally active to practice in your state.

You can search online for professional licenses recognized by the state in which you live.

If you live in New York, for example, you can use a tool on the Office des professions website to verify the credentials of your practitioner.

You can also check with the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) to see if your practitioner is accredited.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has an extensive toolbox of practices and herbs to help you get through cold and flu season.

As with all medical and complementary treatments, always seek treatment from a licensed healthcare practitioner. Never take any herbs or perform any of the practices mentioned by yourself without consulting a practitioner.

Done right, TCM practices can help you get through cold and flu season with a little extra support.

Virginia Duan is the editor-in-chief of Mochi Magazine and you can find her work on various sites such as Scary Mommy, Romper, Mom.com, Diverging Mag, and Mochi Magazine. She reacts to K-pop on YouTube, hosts the Noona ARMY podcast, and founded BrAzn AZN, a series for American Desi creators from Asia-Pacific. Located in the Bay Area of ​​California, she homeschool her four children in Chinese and English. You can follow her on mandarinmama.com.


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Hong Kong seeks to put traditional Chinese medicine on the map http://www.kundalini-support.com/hong-kong-seeks-to-put-traditional-chinese-medicine-on-the-map/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/hong-kong-seeks-to-put-traditional-chinese-medicine-on-the-map/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/hong-kong-seeks-to-put-traditional-chinese-medicine-on-the-map/ Hong Kong’s highly internationalized universities are embroiled in a broader dynamic to bring academic legitimacy to Traditional Chinese Medicine on the global stage through evidence-based research. The most important step is an allocation of HK $ 500 million (£ 46 million) for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the 2021 budget of the Hong Kong government. […]]]>


Hong Kong’s highly internationalized universities are embroiled in a broader dynamic to bring academic legitimacy to Traditional Chinese Medicine on the global stage through evidence-based research.

The most important step is an allocation of HK $ 500 million (£ 46 million) for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the 2021 budget of the Hong Kong government. This sum will help finance the construction of the city’s first Chinese medicine hospital, scheduled to open in 2025 under the auspices of the Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU).

“There are people who see Chinese medicine as something traditional and maybe not as valid. We want to elevate him, ”said Alexander Wai, who took over as HKBU’s vice-chancellor earlier this year. “We want to transform academic disciplines like Chinese medicine with the application of technology.

“There is no future in limiting the subjects you can teach. We want to internationalize Chinese medicine.

Bian Zhaoxiang, who is associate vice president (Chinese medicine development) at HKBU, said the hospital would allow better quality control and research focused on Chinese medicine, describing Hong Kong as a “unique place” which combined both Chinese knowledge and world universities. .

“We hope to create a platform to introduce TCM to the world,” said Professor Bian.

Traditional Chinese healing – including the use of herbs, minerals, and animal products, and practices such as acupuncture – has been used for centuries in Hong Kong and a part of everyday life. The city has about 10,000 practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, as well as 15,000 doctors trained in conventional or Western medicine.

However, the field of traditional Chinese medicine did not receive recognition from the Hong Kong government until after British colonial rule ended in 1997.

The following year, the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) opened Chinese medical schools. In 1999, HKBU became the first university in Hong Kong to offer publicly funded undergraduate degrees in Chinese medicine and pharmacy, with HKU and CUHK adding similar programs a few years later.

HKU is now seeking government approval for a new lab complex to support its six undergraduate medical programs, one of which focuses on Chinese therapies.

There are parallel developments in Macau, another Chinese special administrative region a short ferry ride from Hong Kong. Shortly after the transfer of this city from Portuguese rule to Chinese rule in 1999, the Macau University of Science and Technology opened a Chinese medicine faculty and undergraduate program in 2000, while the He University of Macao established an Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences in 2002.

In mainland China, there have long been universities and institutes dedicated to traditional Chinese medicine in Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing and Guangzhou.

The estate received a boost in public recognition in 2015 when Tu Youyou became the first Chinese national to win a Nobel Prize in medicine, for her discovery of artemisinin, a malaria treatment based on an extract of Chinese herbs.

In May this year, Tsinghua University launched the Beijing Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, an interdisciplinary research center bringing together different departments for “innovation and development of Chinese medicine.”

In addition to government initiatives, physicians advocate a more holistic approach to the field. In June, experts published a letter in the Hong Kong Medical Journal calling for greater integration between the two types of medical disciplines.

“[Traditional Chinese medicine] Practitioners have an important role to play in sharing the health burden in the current Covid-19 pandemic, ”they write, adding that“ the role of discipline is limited and requires deliberation and recognition ”.

Ellis Kam Lun Hon, co-author of this letter and Honorary Clinical Professor at the Institute for Integrative Medicine at CUHK, said that “teaching and research in this area is essential to give it credibility.”

He warned that popular use of traditional Chinese medicine or herbal medicine, without professional scientific supervision and evidence-based research, could lead to “dangerous pseudoscience.”

Dr Hon, who is trained in conventional medicine, also stressed the need for “integrative medicine, which means something that is not exclusively Chinese or Western medicine, but a combination of the two”.

He noted that Canada, Germany, Australia and other countries were also developing their own areas of herbal medicine.

Across the world, academia is increasingly open to incorporating Indigenous wisdom. Arctic researchers have called for increased funding and recognition of indigenous knowledge, especially in understanding the local environment. Indigenous research in Australia and New Zealand is also growing in importance.

joyce.lau@timeshighereducation.com


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Experts Discuss Role of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Fighting COVID-19 – Manila Bulletin http://www.kundalini-support.com/experts-discuss-role-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-in-fighting-covid-19-manila-bulletin/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/experts-discuss-role-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-in-fighting-covid-19-manila-bulletin/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/experts-discuss-role-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-in-fighting-covid-19-manila-bulletin/ Chinese medical experts and Filipino officials exchanged views on their respective experiences in the fight against COVID-19 (2019 coronavirus disease) even as the government in Manila expressed appreciation for China’s assistance in the country’s response to the pandemic, including in-kind and vaccine donations, and sharing best practices and know-how with their Filipino counterparts. Webinar titled […]]]>


Chinese medical experts and Filipino officials exchanged views on their respective experiences in the fight against COVID-19 (2019 coronavirus disease) even as the government in Manila expressed appreciation for China’s assistance in the country’s response to the pandemic, including in-kind and vaccine donations, and sharing best practices and know-how with their Filipino counterparts.

Webinar titled “Learning from the China COVID-19 Experience” (PAITC)

During the webinar titled “Learning from the COVID-19 experience in China”, experts also discussed Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and its important contributions to the fight against the spread of the coronavirus in China. Organized on July 13, the virtual event was co-organized by the Foreign Service Institute (FSI) and the Philippine Archipelago International Trading Corporation (PAITC).

In his welcoming remarks, Foreign Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr. thanked Beijing, saying the partnership with China from the start made the Philippines feel that it was not alone in the fight against the pandemic.

“Maybe the definitive cure will come from the other side of the world, but that won’t change the consolation that on this side of the world from the start we had you. Thank you, China, from the bottom of my heart, ”added the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Eminent Chinese medical experts Zhang Boli, honorary president of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Dr. Jia Zhenhua, president of Hebei Institute of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, discussed separately what one could learn from China’s experience in the control and surge prevention aspect of the pandemic.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Lianhua Qingwen (PAITC)

Dr Jia Zhenhua discussed the use of TCM in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infectious diseases in China as he explained COVID-19 based on the theory of collateral diseases and how it is treated at the using traditional Chinese medicines.

Recipient of the national honorary title of “People’s Hero” in August 2020, Dr. Jia noted the use of Lianhua Qingwen which is now widely used and distributed in the Philippines.

Academician Zhang Boli, one of the most prominent figures in China’s fight against COVID-19, has said he sees COVID-19 as the “bane of the century.”

In his presentation, Zhang showed data explaining the effects and course of the virus and how preventive measures were initially carried out. He discussed the importance of early intervention to reduce severe conversion rate and the integration of Chinese and Western medicine with comprehensive rehabilitation treatment such as respiratory training, physical therapy, Tai- chi, psychotherapy to prevent the sequelae of Covid-19 infection. such as physical injury (damage to immune function, heart, lungs and kidneys) and psychological trauma such as insomnia, anxiety and depression.

Zhang mentioned that another traditional Chinese medicine, Xuanfei Baidu decoction, is also widely used in China against COVID-19.

“Quarantine without drugs is only half the success,” said Zhang, stressing the importance of sharing their knowledge of traditional medicine with the world through donations made to different countries and hosting webinars with other countries like the Philippines.

PAITC President Olivia Limpe-Aw, co-host of the webinar, noted some similarities in terms of experiences, government policies and values ​​of the two countries, especially in the areas of early intervention, midlife with drugs, integration of Chinese and Western medicine with rehabilitation treatment. , and all the others help to increase the curative rate and reduce the death rate. Limpe-Aw is the holder of the EUA (Emergency Use Authorization) for the supply of Sputnik V vaccine to the Philippines.

Baguio City Mayor and Tsar Benjamin Magalong on the National Working Group Contact Tracing joined the panel discussion by recounting how they got through the pandemic through proactive contact tracing efforts that enabled them to control the spread of disease. He said they immediately used a strategy called Prevent, Detect, Isolate, Treat and Reintegrate (PDITR) to cut the chain of transmission.

Deputy Head of National Task Force Implementation and Tsar’s Secretary of Testing Vince Dizon gave an overview of the country’s national immunization program while thanking Chinese foreign service officials for their continued supply of Chinese vaccines. .

To date, China remains the country’s largest supplier of COVID-19 vaccines, especially Sinovac, with 11 million doses purchased and one million doses donated by the Chinese government.



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Can Knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine Help Protect Wildlife? http://www.kundalini-support.com/can-knowledge-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-help-protect-wildlife/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/can-knowledge-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-help-protect-wildlife/ Sun Simiao was a titanic figure in the world of traditional Chinese medicine. Born at the end of the 6th century during the Tang Dynasty and enjoying a remarkable life expectancy of 101 years, he was revered in China – just as the Greek physician Hippocrates was among the practitioners of Western medicine. Sun has […]]]>


Sun Simiao was a titanic figure in the world of traditional Chinese medicine. Born at the end of the 6th century during the Tang Dynasty and enjoying a remarkable life expectancy of 101 years, he was revered in China – just as the Greek physician Hippocrates was among the practitioners of Western medicine. Sun has produced books that are among the foundational writings on Traditional Chinese Medicine, such as the one roughly translated as Essential formulas for emergencies worth a thousand gold coins.

Despite the widespread adoption of Western medicine throughout China today, the traditional methodology practiced by Sun is still an important practice for many people in China and elsewhere, sometimes helping in cases where modern treatments are insufficient.

But some of the ingredients in the remedies listed by Sun, or later adopted by traditional Chinese medicine physicians, have brought practitioners into conflict with the wildlife conservation community. The demand for products like horns has driven species like the western black rhino to extinction, while pangolin species have become the most trafficked animal in the world because of the demand for their scales and meat. Even a species of lizard once common in Southeast Asia, the tokay gecko, is harvested in such numbers for medicinal use that it is disappear from certain regions.

Meanwhile, demand for tiger parts has led to poaching across their range and even affects leopards when used as surrogate ingredients. “What we’re headed for is extinction in the wild,” says Judith Mills, author of the book Tiger blood, which details the fight to conserve big cats in the face of massive demand.

While many are quick to blame the practice of traditional Chinese medicine in general, the reality is not that simple. Some practitioners say the fault lies in misinterpretations of Sun’s original texts, as well as bad faith marketing efforts by the wild animal parts suppliers and controversial tiger farms.

A captive market

By the 1980s, the supply of wild tigers (and other animals such as bears, pangolins and rhinos) whose parts are used in traditional medicine became scarce. “China has started to run out of its own domestic supply of these animals,” Mills said.

In the face of this decline, the government and private profiteers in China have established tiger farms to meet the demand for wild animal parts both domestically and abroad. The idea was that the provision of breeding parts legally would decrease the demand for wild products supplied by poachers.

But for various reasons, Mills says, the plan didn’t work out exactly as planned. For starters, the widespread availability of legal parts only increased demand, which then spilled over to black market parts of the market.

Some people believe these wild parts are actually more effective as medicine, according to surveys in five major cities in China by Mahendra Shrestha, program director of the Tiger Conservation Partnership at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, and others. “Various sources have shown that there is still a huge demand on the wild population because people prefer products from nature over those from captivity,” he says.

Moreover, as the average salary of the Chinese citizen has increased, more and more people can afford the types of products that were previously only available to the elite. This increase in demand has also boosted demand for wildlife products that cannot be grown, such as those from pangolins or rhinos.

Change position

Poaching occurs in many parts of the world for a variety of reasons. Elephant ivory is valued as a luxury material, for example, while other animals may be valued for their bushmeat. Taken together, this practice presents serious challenges for environmentalists. But the demand for traditional Chinese medicine is often driven by people who care about the health and livelihoods of their loved ones. When children suffer from illnesses that cannot be cured by Western medicine, desperate parents will do anything to find potential solutions.

Some traditional medicine practitioners say, however, that these uses are wrong in the first place. Lixing Lao, professor and president of the University of Integrative Medicine of Virginia, prefers to draw inspiration from the original texts written by Sun Simiao nearly 1,500 years ago. Sun wrote that animal parts can sometimes be used to save lives – with the caveat that those parts should only come from animals that have died of natural causes.

“If you kill another life to save ours, it goes against the principle of Chinese medicine,” Lao said, adding that later in his career, Sun completely disowned the use of animal parts. Many Sun disease remedies have multiple options listed as ingredients. Botanicals can often serve the same function, so there’s no need to look to rhino horns or tiger bones. “Chinese medicine has been practiced for many years, but if you look at the literature, animal parts are only a small part,” says Lao.

In other cases, Lao says, business operations divert the original revenue from profit, marketing new types of products as substitutes for wealthy people in search of miracle cures. “They exaggerate a lot of things; it makes it worse, ”he says. Traditional texts might have recommended the use of scales from Chinese pangolin species in some cases. But now that these animals are almost extinct in the wild, vendors claim that the scales of African pangolin species have the same functions. In some cases, traders even promote the consumption of pangolin meat for health purposes, which has never been part of mainstream medicine. “African pangolin species are different from Chinese, but they don’t care,” Lao says.

Shrestha adds that the prices have become so high that leopard and even lion parts are now sometimes replaced with tiger bones. This has contributed to a huge increase in demand, eliminating the populations of Leopards of Indochina in Southeast Asia, for example.

Interior solutions

Mills sees the situation as particularly grim given the amount of money involved and the desperation of those seeking potential treatments. “We’re talking about a lot of money here, and also about national pride,” she said.

Some Westerners may scoff at the idea that any of these practices work in the first place, but this is also incorrect – some traditional remedies work. Bear bile works as a treatment for certain liver diseases, for example, although synthetic substitutes for these wildlife products are available.

But the practice of Western medicine can also pose a threat to certain types of wildlife. Horseshoe crabs, for example, are harvested in great numbers in Delaware Bay for an essential ingredient they contain which is widely used in a number of medicines, including COVID-19 vaccines. These crabs are in decline – in part because of this harvest – and their loss impacts a whole flock of migratory birds that feed on crab eggs, such as red knots.

And Lao and Mills both say there is hope in the younger Chinese generation, many of whom are showing signs of growing awareness and concern for conservation issues. Lao has worked with some ingredient suppliers who have pledged not to use illegal products from poachers.

Lishu Li, who works with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s China program, says the young and educated population in China is significantly more concerned about these issues. But gaps remain between popular perception and actual decision-making. She says if product makers were forced to display the provenance of ingredients, the resulting transparency could help reduce demand for wildlife parts. “Sometimes many consumers and doctors are unaware that these animal parts come from endangered species or lack awareness. [that the endangered status] of these species are linked to their medical use, ”says Li.

She also notes that the government has recently paid a lot of attention to environmental protection, not only in China, but also abroad. The government has also tightened protections for some species, such as pangolins and tokay geckos. But overall, she says, conservation efforts still face a general lack of awareness among the general public. In the end, Li said environmentalists and traditional medicine practitioners had better work together: “Too many controversial points of the finger, too few proposed solutions. “


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Traditional Chinese Medicine Is Accepted Around The World http://www.kundalini-support.com/traditional-chinese-medicine-is-accepted-around-the-world/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/traditional-chinese-medicine-is-accepted-around-the-world/#respond Sat, 12 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/traditional-chinese-medicine-is-accepted-around-the-world/ Traditional Chinese medicine is increasingly accepted around the world. The World Health Organization now endorses Traditional Chinese Medicine, especially in conjunction with Western medicine. Jim Spellman of CGTN visited a doctor helping to spread Chinese medicine in the United States and around the world. Based just outside of Washington DC, the American Center for Chinese […]]]>


Traditional Chinese medicine is increasingly accepted around the world.

The World Health Organization now endorses Traditional Chinese Medicine, especially in conjunction with Western medicine.

Jim Spellman of CGTN visited a doctor helping to spread Chinese medicine in the United States and around the world.

Based just outside of Washington DC, the American Center for Chinese Medicine is dedicated to educating the United States and the world about Traditional Chinese Medicine, or TCM.

“Chinese medicine actually originated in China thousands of years ago,” says Dr. Xuekai Zhang, director of USCCM, “the spread of Chinese medicine around the world is quite large. “

The center trains health professionals and is affiliated with the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine uses techniques like acupuncture, cupping, herbal medicine, and specialized massage known as Tui na.

A traditional Chinese medicine exam usually begins with a series of questions about diet, vision, digestion, hearing, sleep, and other issues. The doctor can then examine the patient’s tongue and take the pulse in three different parts of each wrist.

“I take the pulse in the shallow, medium and very deep layer.” Zhang said, “to get the big picture of your balance in your body. Which part of the body has the most energy, which part is lacking. So it’s a comparison of the three parts.

The doctor may also ask the patient about stress at work or at home and any difficulties that can lead to imbalance in the patient.

“We take the relationship between human being and nature, human being and society and even the interior of the body. We have different organs throughout the system. We consider the balance of these organs to be the priority of our treatment, ”explains Zhang.

Zhang says there is no conflict between modern Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine. The two approaches can often work well together. Many students at the American Center for Chinese Medicine are physicians trained in Western medicine who add TCM techniques to their practices.

TCM has gradually established itself outside of China. The US National Institutes of Health have found that acupuncture and other TCM treatments are safe and effective for certain medical conditions, and the agency is investigating broader applications. In recent years, the World Health Organization has adopted traditional medicine, including TCM, especially in conjunction with Western medicine.

Dr Zhang says traditional Chinese medicine helps the world, while allowing Americans to have a positive interaction with Chinese culture.

“Traditional Chinese medicine makes us, society more harmonious, society more balanced, and it not only helps our body inside, but also all of society, the whole world in a way,” Zhang explains.


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White Lotus College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Acupuncture http://www.kundalini-support.com/white-lotus-college-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-tcm-and-acupuncture/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/white-lotus-college-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-tcm-and-acupuncture/#respond Fri, 14 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/white-lotus-college-of-traditional-chinese-medicine-tcm-and-acupuncture/ The College was born out of a deep love and respect for the subject of TCM and acupuncture. The director (Alan Sheehy) has spent most of his life studying, researching and practicing these arts. In our college we teach classical TCM and acupuncture. What you will learn is authentic with a theoretical and practical history […]]]>


The College was born out of a deep love and respect for the subject of TCM and acupuncture.

The director (Alan Sheehy) has spent most of his life studying, researching and practicing these arts. In our college we teach classical TCM and acupuncture.

What you will learn is authentic with a theoretical and practical history dating back over 2000 years. The approach to imparting this medical knowledge to our students is classic, practical and experiential. This means that our students will learn the theory and practice of TCM and experience it for themselves throughout the program. This makes our college unique in Ireland.

In researching the history of Chinese medicine, we sought to uncover the key to unlocking an understanding that went beyond mere academic understanding. We also wanted to give our students an experiential understanding to allow students to experience theory in action on their own. The vehicle we use to transport our students is solidly based on the classic TCM.

This vehicle is Medical Qi (Chi) Gong. It is the basis of everything in TCM, but for historical reasons it was not taught in the West. The Medical Qi (Vital Energy of the body) Gong, is the basis of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the application of Acupuncture.

In our college, we study the root and branches of traditional Chinese medicine, using classical literary sources, accepted theory of TCM, diagnostic methods of TCM, acupuncture (including all points), cupping, moxibustion and Qigong health promotion.

Western medicine is taught separately.

Course delivery

Three-year part-time course. The first two years of the course are a blended course. Half of the course time will be in the classroom, the other half will be online. The third year is a clinical year

Questions and answers

One hour per week is set aside for online questions, answers and exercises.

Course director

Alan Sheehy is a practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal Medicine, Medical Qigong, Gynecology and TCM Obstetrics and has a clinic in Newcastle West Co. Limerick.

All other teachers are fully qualified practitioners and run their own clinics.

Contact details

www.whitelotus.fr

Phone: 0872480723

Facebook: click here.


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