Physical exercise – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:22:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.kundalini-support.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-favicon-4-32x32.png Physical exercise – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ 32 32 GET PHYSICAL: Exercise Needed For Seniors, Study Finds http://www.kundalini-support.com/get-physical-exercise-needed-for-seniors-study-finds/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 10:34:22 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/get-physical-exercise-needed-for-seniors-study-finds/ Content of the article It’s time to get off the couch and get some exercise, especially if you’re older. Content of the article This is because humans have evolved to live longer, healthier lives through physical activity, even later in life, according to a recent study published in the American Scientific Journal. Proceedings of the […]]]>

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It’s time to get off the couch and get some exercise, especially if you’re older.

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This is because humans have evolved to live longer, healthier lives through physical activity, even later in life, according to a recent study published in the American Scientific Journal. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“It is a common idea in Western societies that as you age it is normal to slow down, do less and retire,” said Daniel E. Lieberman, evolutionary biologist at Harvard, lead author of the article. . Recount The Harvard Gazette .

“Our message is the other way around: as we age, it becomes even more important to stay physically active.”

The study presents the evolutionary and biomedical evidence for human longevity that results from exercise.

Researchers suggest that physical activity essentially helps the body focus on the mechanisms that prolong its function and away from bodily processes that maintain weakened or damaged functions.

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This translates to a reduction in cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and even some cancers, according to the study.

The study compared humans to their ape cousins, who typically live 35 to 40 years in the wild and lead sedentary lives.

We apologize, but this video failed to load.

“We basically evolved from couch potatoes,” Lieberman said. He went to Tanzania to observe wild chimpanzees and was surprised by the time they spent “sitting on their butt, digesting”.

Even though physical activity puts pressure on bones, muscles, and tissues, which can sometimes lead to injury, the body works to repair the damage by rebuilding them stronger.

This in turn causes the release of antioxidants and anti-inflammatories and improves blood circulation. For people who are less active, these responses occur less frequently.

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The body’s repair processes may reduce the risk of diabetes, obesity, cancer, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s and depression, according to the study.

“The key point to remember is that because we have evolved to be active throughout our lives, our bodies need physical activity to age well. In the past, daily physical activity was necessary for survival, but today we have to choose to exercise, that is, to do voluntary physical activity for health and fitness reasons. physical, ”Lieberman said.

And it doesn’t take a lot of effort to realize the benefits of being active.

“The key is to do something and try to make it enjoyable to keep doing it,” Lieberman said. “… Even small amounts of physical activity – just 10 or 20 minutes a day – dramatically reduces your risk of death. “


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Exercise increases the body’s ‘cannabis’, which reduces chronic inflammation http://www.kundalini-support.com/exercise-increases-the-bodys-cannabis-which-reduces-chronic-inflammation/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/exercise-increases-the-bodys-cannabis-which-reduces-chronic-inflammation/ Exercise increases the body’s own cannabis-like substances, which in turn helps reduce inflammation and could potentially help treat conditions like arthritis, cancer, and heart disease. In a new study published in Intestinal microbes, Experts at the University of Nottingham found that the exercise intervention in people with arthritis not only reduced their pain, but also […]]]>

Exercise increases the body’s own cannabis-like substances, which in turn helps reduce inflammation and could potentially help treat conditions like arthritis, cancer, and heart disease.

In a new study published in Intestinal microbes, Experts at the University of Nottingham found that the exercise intervention in people with arthritis not only reduced their pain, but also the levels of inflammatory substances (called cytokines). It also increased the levels of cannabis-like substances produced by their own bodies called endocannabinoids. Interestingly, exercise brought about these changes by altering the microbes in the gut.

Exercise is known to reduce chronic inflammation, which in turn causes many illnesses, including cancer, arthritis, and heart disease, but little is known about how it reduces inflammation.

A group of scientists, led by Professor Ana Valdes of the university’s medical school, tested 78 people with arthritis. Thirty-eight of them did 15 minutes of muscle-building exercises every day for six weeks, and 40 did nothing.

By the end of the study, the participants who did the exercise intervention had not only reduced their pain, but they also had more microbes in their guts of the type that produce anti-inflammatory substances, lower levels of cytokines and higher levels of endocannabinoids.

The increase in endocannabinoids was strongly linked to changes in gut microbes and anti-inflammatory substances produced by gut microbes called SCFAS. In fact, at least a third of the anti-inflammatory effects of the gut microbiome were due to increased endocannabinoids.

Dr. Amrita Vijay, medical school researcher and first author of the article, said: “Our study clearly shows that exercise increases the body’s own cannabis-like substances. Which can have a positive impact on many conditions.

“Like the interest in cannabidiol As oil and other supplements increase, it’s important to know that simple lifestyle interventions like exercise can modulate endocannabinoids.

Reference: “Anti-inflammatory effect of bacterial short-chain fatty acids is partially mediated by endocannabinoids” November 17, 2021, Intestinal microbes.
DOI: 10.1080 / 19490976.202.1997559


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Health experts advise exercise to prevent diabetes – Journal http://www.kundalini-support.com/health-experts-advise-exercise-to-prevent-diabetes-journal/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/health-experts-advise-exercise-to-prevent-diabetes-journal/ LOWER DIR: Health experts here have called diabetes a silent killer and have advised people to make exercise part of their daily routine to protect themselves from the disease. They were addressing a function organized for World Diabetes Day by the Pakistan Endocrine Society in collaboration with a private pharmaceutical company. The Regional Director of […]]]>

LOWER DIR: Health experts here have called diabetes a silent killer and have advised people to make exercise part of their daily routine to protect themselves from the disease.

They were addressing a function organized for World Diabetes Day by the Pakistan Endocrine Society in collaboration with a private pharmaceutical company.

The Regional Director of Health, Dr Shaukat Ali, the District Health Officer, Dr Irshad Rughani, Dr Daud Khan and Dr Saeedur Rehman spoke on the occasion. Doctors, nurses, paramedics and alumni from the region attended the event.

Speakers said diabetes was spreading in all parts of the country. They said most of the diabetic patients belonged to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and 26% of them belonged to Lower Dir.

They said people needed awareness and proper counseling about the disease. They said people need to change their lifestyle, maintain their body weight, and make physical exercise part of their routine to avoid illness.

FARMERS: Farmers and peasants demanded an immediate reduction in the prices of everyday items.

Speaking to local reporters in Talash, they said the increase in the prices of everyday items hit them hard as they were unable to afford fertilizer and wheat seeds.

They said Pakistan was an agricultural country but people associated with agriculture received no relief.

PML-N: Dozens of workers from various parties joined PML-N at a reception in the Munda district of Jandol.

Speaking on the occasion, MP Sobia Khan, who was the main guest on the occasion, PML-N Provincial Vice President Malik Bahram Shehzada and Javed Akhtar said the government had not launched any mega project to Dir.

Political activists including Haji Noor Rehman, Haji Rohullah Shakir, Mir Habib Jan, Mastaq Jan, Aurangzeb Khan, Sher Bahadar and Fazl Hameed as well as their families and supporters joined PML-N on this occasion.

Posted in Dawn, November 9, 2021


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The hidden link between physical exercise and work performance http://www.kundalini-support.com/the-hidden-link-between-physical-exercise-and-work-performance/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/the-hidden-link-between-physical-exercise-and-work-performance/ Is there an intrinsic link between physical exercise and work performance? One of the biggest stories to emerge from the Tokyo 2020 Olympics wasn’t about an athlete’s performance at all, it was quite the opposite. Simone Biles – one of the world’s greatest athletes – made headlines when she retired in the middle of team […]]]>

Is there an intrinsic link between physical exercise and work performance? One of the biggest stories to emerge from the Tokyo 2020 Olympics wasn’t about an athlete’s performance at all, it was quite the opposite. Simone Biles – one of the world’s greatest athletes – made headlines when she retired in the middle of team competition, citing the need to put her own sanity first.

“We live in a world where we are always active. Whether it’s pressure at work – having to do more with less, balancing work and home, or even increasing digital connectivity. “

As someone who regularly undertakes a large volume of physical activity, can we still claim a correlation between movement and our ability to do work?

Find a performance connection

Where I work, we launched the Accolade Wines Leadership Podcast Realize your potential to share ideas and learnings with our staff and, more recently, a wide range of people around the world. For Series 3, we specifically invited distinguished guests from the elite sports world. Everyone was asked about the importance of physical exercise and how it relates to mental health. This knowledge reinforced the company’s conviction in the important link between the acquisition of resilience and the continuation of physical activity.

We live in a world where we are always on. Whether it’s pressure at work – being asked to do more with less, balancing work and home, or even increasing digital connectivity. Resilience helps us cope with this and the podcast guests, almost unanimously, felt that if physical exercise were embraced, it would help improve the way we live and work.

Good leaders recognize that our personal life is closely linked to our professional life. We need to make sure we are happy and healthy if we are to get to work every day and do our best.

Make health and fitness count

Exercise is a basic strategy to achieve this. It releases endorphins and serotonin, which improve your mood and pump blood to your brain. Simply put, exercise helps you think more clearly. It also increases the size of the hippocampus, the part of your brain responsible for memory. Companies that encourage their employees to incorporate some form of exercise into their daily lives and work on their mental health, by promoting practices like meditation, will reap the rewards of a more productive workforce.

Physical activity also has a positive impact on our mental health. People who have greater mental resilience can persevere for longer. The stresses associated with a busy workplace are inevitable, but it’s our ability to stick with something in the face of setbacks that is the true indication of success. Indeed, academic and psychologist Angela Duckworth has discovered that a combination of passion and perseverance for a singularly important goal, or as she coined it, courage, is the hallmark of top performing people in almost any career. areas.

“Physical activity has been shown to improve focus, aid memory, speed learning, and reduce stress.”

Podcast guest Tanner Gardner, COO and Senior Associate Athletic Director at Rice University also believes in the value of courage. The students at his university have top athletic performance, and balancing that with a heavy study load teaches them the value of persistence before entering the workforce. Ready to accept failure, students learn that mustering the courage to continue is the key to triumph. A key attribute that makes Rice University graduates so attractive to employers.

In our workplace, we take a holistic approach to actively create a high performance environment that builds resilience. Exercise is a big part of this and recently we launched an internal “Accolade on the Move” campaign that challenged our employees around the world to register 150 minutes of exercise per week. Each competed in a team, made up of employees from different countries and departments, because despite their geographic distance, they worked together on a common goal.

Identify the performance link

So what about the link between our physical exercise and work performance? Well a report from 2013 discovered that our mental agility can be directly linked to exercise.

Physical activity has been shown to improve focus, help memory, speed up learning, and reduce stress. All the factors that contribute to our ability to present and perform at work. The article also points out that while many of us are busy and find it difficult to prioritize physical activity – in the long run – it saves us time by making sure we are more productive overall. . Physical movement was also correlated with improved mood. I’m sure you’ll enjoy something too if, like me, your day involves engaging with multiple stakeholders.

It’s important that we make the habit of physical activity a part of our daily lives, but it doesn’t always have to be a gym or a run if that’s something you don’t enjoy. As work cultures change, we find ourselves online at unsociable hours to host international meetings or full schedules. Finding the time to prioritize a daily exercise habit allows us to shift our mindset to make sure we view daily exertion as a precursor to productivity. Just as we prioritize a big project or a deadline, we need to devote time to our physical health as it is vital for better overall performance. Companies must also support this change.

Sport has always been a big part of my life, but running is something that I discovered later in life. I’ll be the first to admit I’m not a natural, but consistency, hard work, and persistence has made this something that improves my outlook. For me, nothing can beat the mental clarity that a run before work can bring, and it’s also the perfect way to disconnect at the end of the day.

Like most things in life, balance is important, but choosing to exercise has real physiological benefits for mental clarity and teaches us persistence. I’ve learned over time that not all races will be my best, but getting through the toughest races builds fitness and resilience, not only for the next race, but also for work and life. life.

All of these benefits contribute to the reasons why physical and mental health should be at the center of our concerns, thanks to their intrinsic link with our ability to perform at work.

Anjanette Murfet is Director of Human Resources and Communication at Accolade Wines. She is a passionate believer in the intrinsic link between exercise and mental health and also believes that at the corporate level, better mental health must start at the top.

Read more : Sleep Habits and Routines of Highly Successful People


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What does lack of exercise mean for your body? http://www.kundalini-support.com/what-does-lack-of-exercise-mean-for-your-body/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/what-does-lack-of-exercise-mean-for-your-body/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/what-does-lack-of-exercise-mean-for-your-body/ While the exercise routine can be flexible and personal, not exercising at all can be harmful to your health. Not only does it help a person to stay physically active and healthy, exercise also ensures their mental well-being which, in the pandemic, has been prioritized. Amol Naikawadi, Co-Managing Director and Preventive Health Care Specialist at […]]]>

While the exercise routine can be flexible and personal, not exercising at all can be harmful to your health. Not only does it help a person to stay physically active and healthy, exercise also ensures their mental well-being which, in the pandemic, has been prioritized.

Amol Naikawadi, Co-Managing Director and Preventive Health Care Specialist at Indus Health Plus, says indianexpress.com that sport, along with fitness and genes, can help build and strengthen a person’s immunity.

“We’ve seen and heard a lot of conversations about the immediate effects of exercise, but the lesser known fact is that it can help us fight bacteria, viruses and other pathogens. An exercise routine can remove bacteria from our internal airways, increase antibodies and make them more robust, improve blood circulation and reduce stress hormones like cortisol, adrenaline, ”he explains.

Naikawadi also says moderate but consistent and regular exercise can do wonders for the body. “Locomotion and movement are essential. In addition to helping with immunity, they reduce inflammation in the body, lower blood sugar, help maintain a healthy weight, prevent lifestyle-related diseases, thereby promoting longevity.

The most effective fitness activities, he says, include heavy exercise and fast walk, cycling and running. “These are enough to circulate more immune cells. “

But what happens when there is no exercise at all?

According to Naikawadi, no exercise will lead to a weaker immune system and make our bodies more susceptible to different types of infections. Besides affecting our immune system, it will also increase the risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other non-communicable diseases.

“Don’t force your body to do high intensity workouts on day one or if you’ve just recovered from an illness. Practice within your constraints. The best way to monitor your physical condition would be to monitor the number of steps you have taken, ”he warns.

No exercise will lead to a weaker immune system and make our bodies more susceptible to different types of infections. (Photo: Getty / Thinkstock)

What about genetic traits for fitness?

Naikawadi adds that sometimes our body may not respond well to exercise, and that’s because of the genes.

“Some people get tired easily from light workouts and others gain weight despite a heavy fitness regimen. Each individual has a different response to various forms of exercise and sport which in part depends on genes. Understanding your genetic pattern can help you build a fitness plan that works best for your body, ”he says.

You can find out the impact of exercise on your weight and various other physiological processes such as:

– Blood pressure response to exercise
– HDL cholesterol levels with exercise
– Insulin sensitivity with exercise
– Hand grip strength
– Weight loss with exercise

Additionally, to understand what type of exercise is best for you, a genetic / DNA test can guide you. Sports genomics, a relatively new concept, studies the genetic makeup or architecture that contributes to an athlete’s performance, explains Naikawadi.

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How the importance of exercise persisted through COVID-19 http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-the-importance-of-exercise-persisted-through-covid-19/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-the-importance-of-exercise-persisted-through-covid-19/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-the-importance-of-exercise-persisted-through-covid-19/ ?? The ongoing pandemic has changed the exercise routines of people around the world as gyms, fitness centers, swimming pools and parks have been forced to adjust daily functions to meet local and national guidelines. As a result, many people did not have access to gym equipment or other resources that they would typically use […]]]>

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The ongoing pandemic has changed the exercise routines of people around the world as gyms, fitness centers, swimming pools and parks have been forced to adjust daily functions to meet local and national guidelines. As a result, many people did not have access to gym equipment or other resources that they would typically use for training for months.

However, as Siddhartha Angadi, cardiovascular exercise physiologist in the University’s kinesiology department attests, even as the restrictions are easing, the importance of engaging in physical activity remains.

The Proceedings of the Mayo Clinic published a to study January 1 detailing the relationship between exercise capacity and hospitalization due to COVID-19. The study found an inverse relationship between an individual’s ability to exercise and their likelihood of being hospitalized with COVID-19, meaning that a lack of exercise was directly linked to a deterioration of health in the face of COVID-19.

“Essentially, exercise kind of gives your body a … cardiopulmonary cushion, and so if you contract a disease like COVID-19, the good news is that while it affects how your lungs work, you have it. integrated cushion – you can avoid serious results, ”says Angadi

There are a variety of different activities that people can do to improve their level of fitness. According to Angadi, the recommendation is 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, and this exercise could be as easy as a brisk walk. It is more important to exercise regularly than to focus on the type of exercise chosen according to Angadi.

Meredith Brooker, a 2021 alumnus, worked as a personal trainer at the University as an undergraduate student, and she believes it is more important to choose an exercise that the individual feels it is. can commit to doing rather than a particular type of exercise.

“If you love to run and think it’s something you can do week after week, then running is great,” said Brooker. “If you love weightlifting and think you can hit the gym every week, then that’s great. I have the impression that there is no one size fits all.

In addition to reducing the risk of hospitalization from COVID-19, exercise has many long-term preventative health benefits.

“Exercise is one of the most effective [ways] we have to prevent everything from dying in general from cardiovascular disease, cancer, etc. ”Said Angadi. “When you look at people who are just a little bit fit, versus those who are not, you see a pretty substantial 30-50% reduction in these future events. “

While COVID-19 may have changed the way students and teachers train for some time, it has also created new or adjusted ways of training. Gyms on and off the courts have taken COVID-19 precautions by increasing sanitation levels, adjusting the size of group classes, and offering virtual classes or pre-recorded exercise videos.

Haleigh Hopper, a 2021 alumnus and personal trainer, said she noticed a difference between the way people exercised before the pandemic started and what they did in the spring semester.

“COVID has definitely changed things,” Hopper said. “A lot of people try more stuff online. I know personal training tried to do things online, group exercise tried to do things online and that also forced people not to go to gyms.

Trainers like Hopper were able to record exercise videos for others to use. For example, the Instagram of intramural and recreational sports at the University page offers exercise demonstrations such as jump rope exercises. In addition, the recreational sports site contains information about upcoming courses, events and offerings online and in person.

The biggest piece of advice Brooker could give to people looking to start training more is to commit to a schedule when training.

“Plan ahead when you’re going to exercise,” Brooker said. “Set aside an hour in your schedule each week when you go to exercise. I feel like if you haven’t planned it out, it tends not to happen.



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Exercise can improve cancer-induced anemia http://www.kundalini-support.com/exercise-can-improve-cancer-induced-anemia/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/exercise-can-improve-cancer-induced-anemia/ Many cancer patients suffer from anemia, leaving them tired, weak, and unable to perform physical activity. Medicines rarely relieve this type of anemia. Researchers at the University of Basel have now been able to show the causes of anemia and that physical exercise can improve this condition. The two main symptoms of cancer are loss […]]]>

Many cancer patients suffer from anemia, leaving them tired, weak, and unable to perform physical activity. Medicines rarely relieve this type of anemia. Researchers at the University of Basel have now been able to show the causes of anemia and that physical exercise can improve this condition.

The two main symptoms of cancer are loss of muscle mass and reduced hemoglobin levels, leading to weight loss, fatigue, lethargy, and reduced physical performance. In addition, the two symptoms – atrophy and anemia – prompt many patients to make a doctor’s appointment, which in turn leads to the diagnosis of a tumor. Why cancer causes muscle atrophy and anemia is not yet understood, and treatment is currently difficult.

The fact that anemia leads to a decline in general health and can negatively affect the course of cancer treatment underscores the urgency of obtaining information on causes and potential remedies. In collaboration with the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel, the research group of Prof. Christoph Handschin at the Biozentrum has now been able to show in a mouse model that cancer not only triggers a systemic inflammatory reaction, but also massively modifies the manipulation of lipids and other metabolites in the body.

The fight of the body is unsuccessful

These changes lead to increased destruction of red blood cells linked to the tumor. The study published in Science Advances shows that exercise normalizes these metabolic abnormalities and thus reduces the anemia caused by cancer.

The body tries to counter the breakdown by increasing the production of red blood cells in the bone marrow and spleen – without success. However, the increased production of blood cells is insufficient to prevent anemia associated with tumors. “We have now been able to clarify how cancer causes the breakdown of red blood cells,” explains Christoph Handschin. “Cancer massively alters the metabolism of lipids and other compounds. This alters not only red blood cells but also macrophages, causing a sharp increase in the destruction of red blood cells by macrophages.” Macrophages are a type of white blood cell and are part of the immune system.

Exercise normalizes metabolism and relieves anemia

The research group attempted to normalize the metabolism by pharmacological means. However, none of the drugs could significantly improve the anemia. In contrast, the metabolism was so regulated by exercise that the anemia also decreased. Even the abnormal increase in red blood cell production could be reduced to a lower level.

The training restored the tumor-induced metabolic remodeling and inflammation sufficiently to reduce the excessive formation and destruction of blood cells. “

Professor Christoph Handschin

This study provides new information on the development of tumor associated anemia. The results suggest that exercise is a useful therapy for cancer patients, to counteract anemia and associated fatigue and lethargy and in turn improve their overall well-being and quality of life. This also leads to better tolerance of radio- and chemotherapy, as has been established previously.

Source:

Journal reference:

Hammarström, S., et al. (2021) Remodeling of metabolism and inflammation through exercise improves anemia associated with tumors. Scientists progress. doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abi4852.


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How Exercise Helps Treat Depression, Anxiety, and Stress http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-exercise-helps-treat-depression-anxiety-and-stress/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-exercise-helps-treat-depression-anxiety-and-stress/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/how-exercise-helps-treat-depression-anxiety-and-stress/ Today, I was out at 6am when I saw people from a gym window running on a treadmill. I kept wondering what would make them go out so early to exercise. Well, people who exercise regularly enjoy mental benefits like more energy throughout the day, feel more relaxed, sleep better, and generally have better mental […]]]>

Today, I was out at 6am when I saw people from a gym window running on a treadmill. I kept wondering what would make them go out so early to exercise.

Well, people who exercise regularly enjoy mental benefits like more energy throughout the day, feel more relaxed, sleep better, and generally have better mental health.

Exercise relieves anxiety by releasing endorphins. Also, helps an anxious thought relief technique known as mindfulness.

When you exercise, you can focus on the rhythm of your breathing, the movement of your legs, or the feeling of the wind on your skin. All of this helps you focus on your body and reduce the flow of anxious thoughts.

Studies show that exercise is as effective as antidepressants in treating mild to moderate depression.

Exercise helps fight depression because of the various changes it makes to the brain. It promotes neural growth and brain activities that make you feel calm and settled.

Exercise also releases endorphins which are happy hormones that uplift your spirit and make you happy.

Finally, when you exercise, your mind is distracted by depressive thoughts and emotions.

Exercise also helps relieve stress. When you are stressed you feel it in your body, your muscles tighten, your neck hurts, you have a headache, you have back pain as well as many other physical symptoms but exercise fixes that helping you relax and relieve tension not only in your body but in your mind.

Your body and mind are linked to each other. If your body is well taken care of, so will your mind.


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Setting individual goals for exercise and supporting their pursuit generates positive and lasting change http://www.kundalini-support.com/setting-individual-goals-for-exercise-and-supporting-their-pursuit-generates-positive-and-lasting-change/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/setting-individual-goals-for-exercise-and-supporting-their-pursuit-generates-positive-and-lasting-change/ The cardiovascular implications of physical exercise can be improved by helping individuals design and accomplish key goals, resulting in lasting benefits and better behavior changes. Image Credit: Rido / Shutterstock.com Explore decision making related to exercise in low income and high risk areas According to a new study by researchers at the Department of Medicine […]]]>

The cardiovascular implications of physical exercise can be improved by helping individuals design and accomplish key goals, resulting in lasting benefits and better behavior changes.

Image Credit: Rido / Shutterstock.com

Explore decision making related to exercise in low income and high risk areas

According to a new study by researchers at the Department of Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, setting exercise-related goals and pursuing them immediately results in longer lasting and more frequent physical activity.

The results, published in the journal JAMA Cardiology, considered low-income areas most at risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Indeed, many of these areas lack the facilities or resources to maintain consistent physical activities due to lack of policies and support.

In addition, behavioral changes at the individual level associated with more frequent or intense exercise remain unclear, as decision making can be disrupted by several factors.

Lead author Mitesh Patel, MD, MBA, associate professor of medicine at Penn and vice president of clinical transformation at Ascension, describes the value of this study:

Most behavior change programs involve goal setting, but the best way to think about this process is unknown. Our clinical trial showed that physical activity increased the most when patients chose their goals rather than being assigned to them, and when goals started immediately rather than starting lower and gradually increased over time. These findings are particularly important because the patients came from low-income neighborhoods and may face a number of challenges in achieving their health goals. “

Using data from 500 patients from low-income neighborhoods in West Philadelphia as well as elsewhere in and out of the city, participants were chosen based on their cardiovascular disease or of their risk of developing one in a decade. .

The lasting benefits of gamification and other induced behavioral strategies

A focal strategy often used in Patel’s previous work at the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit was the gamification of behavioral decision-making.

Gamification is a concept that refers to creating a change in behavior by turning it into a game, and previous studies have examined whether playing games with physical activity goals can increase the time spent playing the game. compared to not playing or playing with other associated goals.

Similar to their previous work, each participant wore a step tracker in the present study to determine the number of daily steps through the Penn’s Way to Health platform.

However, a new outcome was designed that sets this study apart from other work, as the analysis focused on determining the goals themselves and when to pursue the goals instead of just participating in the game.

Participants had a week or two to acclimate to the bracelet, which also provided baseline data on individual step counts. Subsequently, individuals were assigned either to the control group, which did not have step goals, to the play group, or to one of the play groups with goals.

The gamified group then made two subsets of assignments; the first was to determine if they had chosen or received a milestone goal, and the second task was to decide if participants would immediately start working on the goals or if they had incremental increases toward the goal.

The results showed that the only group of participants who achieved a higher increase in activity were those who chose their own goals and started immediately.

This group had the largest increase in steps compared to the aimless group, averaging 1,384 steps per day. In addition, the study also measured periods of sustained and intense activity, representing an average daily increase of 4.1 minutes over the 8-week period.

Determining and achieving individual goals is most effective

People who choose their own goals are more likely to be intrinsically motivated to achieve them. They feel like the goal is theirs and that probably allows for more engagement.

Kevin Volpp, MD, Ph.D., director of the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics

During the 8 weeks following the trial, the participants also kept their trackers on, and this period also showed that the group that chose their goals and started immediately maintained their progress in step count.

This improvement was only three steps less than during active play, demonstrating that the group achieved almost the exact increase than during the trial. “It’s exciting to see that the group that increased their activity levels the most number of steps maintained those levels during follow-up,” Patel said. “This indicates that gamification with personal and immediate goals has helped these patients develop a new habit. “

Often, the physical health programs offered by work or health insurances offer incentives for physical activity, but the goals are static and based on round numbers ignoring individual goals or aiding in individual decision making.

The results of this study suggest that goal setting in these programs has important effects for individuals, and if programs can adapt to help individuals set and pursue goals quickly, then it can have significant impact. great benefits to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease.

Goal setting is a fundamental part of almost every physical activity program, whether through a smartphone app or as part of a workplace wellness program. Our results reveal a simple approach that could be used to improve the impact of these programs and the health of their patients. “

Volpp

Journal reference:

  • Patel MS, Bachireddy C, Small DS, et al. Effect of goal-setting approaches as part of a gamification intervention to increase physical activity in economically disadvantaged adults at high risk of major adverse cardiovascular events: the randomized clinical trial ENGAGE. JAMA Cardiol. Published online September 01, 2021. doi: 10.1001 / jamacardio.2021.3176


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Study, Health News, ET HealthWorld http://www.kundalini-support.com/study-health-news-et-healthworld/ http://www.kundalini-support.com/study-health-news-et-healthworld/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/study-health-news-et-healthworld/ Washington: A recent study has shed more light on why regular exercise is beneficial in Alzheimer’s disease. The study may provide new insights for disease prevention or effective treatment approaches. The study was published in a special issue of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences titled Redox-Active Metals in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Implications. Deregulation of […]]]>
Washington: A recent study has shed more light on why regular exercise is beneficial in Alzheimer’s disease. The study may provide new insights for disease prevention or effective treatment approaches.

The study was published in a special issue of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences titled Redox-Active Metals in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Implications.

Deregulation of brain iron metabolism and iron accumulation are known to be associated with aging and AD, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Iron loading and inflammation are known to regulate the synthesis of hepcidin, the main iron regulatory protein.

In particular, the inflammation-modulating cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), also known to modulate brain-muscle crosstalk, is involved in activating hepcidin synthesis in the brain. Although regular physical exercise is known to have a beneficial effect on total body iron metabolism and anti-inflammatory action, the role of regular exercise on iron homeostasis in the brain and in the context of AD remains uncertain.

The researchers used wild-type mice and 5xFAD transgenic mice, modeling AD to explore the effect of regular exercise on the modulation of iron homeostasis. Half of the mice had unlimited use of a running wheel during the six-month experiment. Levels of iron and related proteins were analyzed in the brain and skeletal muscles.

The researchers also investigated the potential involvement of iron in crosstalk between the brain and the periphery during regular exercise.

The present study shows that regular physical exercise modulates the storage and trafficking of iron in the brain and skeletal muscles. In addition, this study is the first to report a reduction in cortical hepcidin in response to regular exercise. The results suggest that IL-6 is a key modulator of hepcidin in exercise-induced modulation of brain iron.


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