Physical exercise – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ Sat, 21 May 2022 10:04:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.kundalini-support.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-favicon-4-32x32.png Physical exercise – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ 32 32 Higher levels of physical exercise linked to reduced depressive symptoms in older adults http://www.kundalini-support.com/higher-levels-of-physical-exercise-linked-to-reduced-depressive-symptoms-in-older-adults/ Fri, 20 May 2022 20:07:38 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/higher-levels-of-physical-exercise-linked-to-reduced-depressive-symptoms-in-older-adults/ Physical exercise appears to have a significant and beneficial impact on depression in older adults, according to new research published in the journal Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte. Depressive disorder is a serious health problem in older people. Depression consists of feelings of loneliness, helplessness, worthlessness and sometimes leads to suicide. Research shows that […]]]>

Physical exercise appears to have a significant and beneficial impact on depression in older adults, according to new research published in the journal Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte.

Depressive disorder is a serious health problem in older people. Depression consists of feelings of loneliness, helplessness, worthlessness and sometimes leads to suicide. Research shows that traditional therapies, such as psychotherapy, are not as effective in treating depression in older adults due to the unique physiological and psychological characteristics of older adults. Researcher Linyan Dang, from Henan Finance University in China, was interested in studying the effects of physical exercise on depression in the elderly.

Dang recruited 145 men and 125 women over the age of 60 to complete the survey items of the Physical Exercise Scale and the Concise Depression Scale for Older People and Brink for Older People. The results of this study show that most of the participants had a positive attitude towards physical exercise. About 25% of the participants were classified as suffering from depression, of which 6% suffered from severe depression.

The data show a negative correlation between marital status and health status and depression in that people with the worst marital status and health status were more depressed. Data analyzes showed that depression scores were lower in participants who had a more positive attitude towards exercise, exercised moderately intensely, exercised more often, and had a best experience after exercise.

For example, seniors who report exercising 3-4 times per week are more depressed than those who exercise 5-7 times per week. Additionally, depression scores were lower for people who exercised with a partner than alone. This study also shows that women were slightly more depressed than men.

Dang argues that exercise in the elderly cannot be ignored when it comes to depression because exercise appears to alleviate depressive symptoms more than other therapies. She also argues that older adults should maintain a positive attitude towards exercise and make it part of their daily routine. Including physical exercise in a daily routine may help prevent depression in older adults, but more research is needed.

The study, “Exercises to Relieve the Current State of Depression”, was published on November 29, 2021.

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Effects of physical exercise and body weight on disease-specific outcomes of people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal (RMD) diseases: systematic reviews and meta-analyses informing EULAR 2021 recommendations for lifestyle improvement people with MMR http://www.kundalini-support.com/effects-of-physical-exercise-and-body-weight-on-disease-specific-outcomes-of-people-with-rheumatic-and-musculoskeletal-rmd-diseases-systematic-reviews-and-meta-analyses-informing-eular-2021-recomme/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 06:00:00 +0000 This article was originally published here RMD open. Mar 2022;8(1):e002168. doi:10.1136/rmdopen-2021-002168. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) was convened to develop recommendations on lifestyle behaviors in rheumatic and musculoskeletal (MMR) diseases. This article reviews the literature on the effects of exercise and body weight on the disease-specific outcomes of […]]]>

This article was originally published here

RMD open. Mar 2022;8(1):e002168. doi:10.1136/rmdopen-2021-002168.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) was convened to develop recommendations on lifestyle behaviors in rheumatic and musculoskeletal (MMR) diseases. This article reviews the literature on the effects of exercise and body weight on the disease-specific outcomes of people with MMR.

METHODS: Three systematic reviews were conducted to summarize evidence related to exercise and weight in seven RMDs: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), psoriatic arthritis, systemic sclerosis and gout. Systematic reviews and original studies were included if they assessed exercise or weight in any of the above RMDs and reported results regarding disease-specific outcomes (eg, pain, function, joint damage) . Systematic reviews were only included if they were published between 2013 and 2018. Search strategies were implemented in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews and CENTRAL databases.

RESULTS: 236 exercise articles and 181 weight articles were included. Exercise interventions resulted in improvements in outcomes such as pain and function across all RMDs, although the magnitude of the effect varied by RMD and intervention. Disease activity was not influenced by exercise, except in axSpA. Increased body weight was associated with poorer outcomes for the majority of MDMs and assessed outcomes. In general, study quality was moderate for the literature on exercise and body weight in RMD, although there was considerable heterogeneity between studies.

CONCLUSION: Current literature supports the recommendation of exercise and maintenance of healthy body weight for people with MMR.

PMID:35361692 | DOI: 10.1136/rmdopen-2021-002168

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Door stops: physical exercise and mental training http://www.kundalini-support.com/door-stops-physical-exercise-and-mental-training/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/door-stops-physical-exercise-and-mental-training/ By VIKAS DATTA Some news portals may have a small blurb next to an article title that tells the reader how long it will take to read it – usually five minutes or less. The feature, which can also be found on some online editing tools, seems like a rather telling indictment of our contemporary […]]]>

By VIKAS DATTA

Some news portals may have a small blurb next to an article title that tells the reader how long it will take to read it – usually five minutes or less. The feature, which can also be found on some online editing tools, seems like a rather telling indictment of our contemporary time-stressed and hyper-regimented lives, but it’s unclear why it’s limited to reading. uniquely.

Assuming this trend is also transplanted into books? Will it work on what are known in the literary field as “doorstops”, or works so thick and heavy, say over 500 to 1000 pages or more, that they can be used as the eponymous article.

For such books, reading time will need to be measured in weeks or even months, and for casual, uncommitted readers, it could be up to a year.

While many leading comprehensive dictionaries, encyclopedias, and textbooks from various fields of science to law to computer languages ​​are doorstops, the category is still common in fiction. These should be differentiated from omnibus editions in which two or three “medium” works by one author, or even more than one author, are printed together.

Door stops in fiction usually include what we call literary classics, say George Eliot’s “Middlemarch” (nearly 900 pages), or Count Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” (over 1,000 pages in most editions), or “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes. (nearly or more than 1,000 pages, depending on the edition).

They can also be about titanic conflicts between good and evil – everything from Alexandre Dumas’ great revenge saga “The Count of Monte Cristo” (over 1,000 pages in most editions) to the Harry Potter series (especially the last four episodes, with “The Order of the Phoenix” being 700 to 800 pages, depending on the edition), to great sweeps of history, spanning several generations, as by authors such than James Michener and James Clavell, or novels (Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone with the Wind”, 900-1,000 pages), or a mixture of everything, say MM Kaye’s “The Far Pavilions” (over 950 pages).

And you can count on them to have tons of characters – “The Count of Monte Cristo” starts with half a dozen and continues with three dozen major characters as it kicks into high gear. Others are not lacking and some helpfully have a list of characters, usually at the start, to help you keep track.

The advent of technology has made actual doorstops rather rare, as e-readers and tablets can accommodate multitudes of the bulkiest of books, saving avid readers the drudgery of lugging them around – although some aficionados still do. Owning them is also a mark of pride for avid librarians for the gravitas they bring to their shelves.

Let’s look at some door stops in different genres.

As mentioned, literary classics, such as Tolstoy – whose surname derives from the Russian word “tolstii” (meaning thick or big), or by his compatriot Fyodor Dostoyevsky, or others, such as Charles Dickens, Victor Hugo or Dumas, turn out to be door blockers, since they are paid by the page, and seem to have made the most of it. Most of their famous works began as serial episodes, so they didn’t consciously – one would assume – set out to write heavy tomes.

Dumas was a master. His “The Three Musketeers” is the first of three novels that make up the Romances D’Artagnan, and was followed by “Vingt Ans Après” – both are at least 700 pages and more in most editions. The last episode, “Le Vicomte de Bragelonne”, is usually divided into three or more books – the last being “The Man in the Iron Mask”, and each of them is over 700-800 pages.

Dickens was not far behind – of his 14 completed novels, eight, including ‘The Pickwick Papers’, ‘Nicholas Nickleby’, ‘David Copperfield’ and ‘Our Mutual Friend’ are well over 800 pages in most editions, and some cover 1,000 pages. plus pages with annotations and footnotes.

But the tradition continued beyond the 19th century.

JRR Tolkien’s epic high-fantasy adventure “The Lord of the Rings”, well-known because of the movies, is a prime example.

Although Tolkien intended it to be published as one, it was eventually published in three volumes of two books each – ‘The Fellowship of the Ring’, ‘The Two Towers’ and ‘The Return of the King’ – between July 1954 and October 1955, due for various reasons, such as paper shortages, high production costs, and publishers’ uncertainty about its reception.

Fortunately, the publishers then published it together – a special hardcover, illustrated edition that came out in 2021 included 1,248 pages each and a paperback, 1,216 pages.

Even before him was Kathleen Winsor’s hit historical romance “Forever Amber” (1944), set in mid-17th century England when the monarchy was restored under Charles II. It tells the story of Amber St. Clare, an orphan, who advances in society by sleeping and/or marrying successively wealthier and more important men, while nurturing her unattainable love. It was quickly censored by the Catholic Church, making it a bestseller.

What prevents the book, which is 992 pages in its Penguin paperback edition, from being a precursor to Jackie Collins or, say, Shobha De, is the meticulous historical research covering food and candy fashion, such as how the tea habit took hold of England, as well as contemporary politics and public disasters, including the plague and the Great Fire of London.

Austrian writer Robert Musil’s Modernist work “The Man Without Qualities” (first published 1930 in German; 1953 in English) is a quasi-allegorical, existential – and satirical – look at the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Habsburg Hungarians in the twilight period, just before World War I.

The main protagonist is a rather vague, ambivalent and indifferent mathematician named Ulrich, “the man without qualities”, who depends on the world to shape himself. The work also shows how a celebration of international peace and imperial unity leads to national chauvinism, war and collapse.

It was unfinished, but the English version is over 1,150 pages, while the original German version is over 2,100.

After “full size” works such as the interracial love story “Sayonara” (1954) and the depiction of a radically different Afghanistan in “Caravans” (1963), Michener began producing doorstops with its multi-generational shows taking place in a specific context. geographical area.

“Hawaii” (1959) is 1,136 pages in paperback; “The Source” (1965), where a team of archaeologists excavate a mound in Israel, and their story is interspersed with a narrative of each level they uncover, is 1,104 pages in paperback; “Caribbean” (1989), stretching from Columbus to Castro or thereabouts, is about 900 pages.

Several other works in this tradition, whether they deal with a specific American state—Texas (1,472 pages), Alaska (1,152) or Colorado (1,104)—or countries such as Poland (about 700 pages), or South Africa (1,200), are also heavy reads.

Francis Edward Wintle aka Edward Rutherfurd also follows the same pattern, traveling through the millennia of the region he dwells on, featuring many characters and not skimping on details. “Russka: The Novel of Russia” (1991) has 1,024 pages; “London” (1997), the history of the city from Roman times to the present day, covers 1,328 pages; and “New York” (900–1,050 pages in various paperback editions).

The final four books in Clavell’s “Asian Saga” are over 1,000 pages, including “Shogun” (1975), set in 1600s Japan, at 1,136 pages, and “Noble House” (1981) , which is about Hong Kong in the 1960s, is 1,296 pages long – although the latter, after an interlude in the past, is only a few days long.

The penchant for doorstops still persists.

Horror maestro Stephen King’s “Dark Tower” series began with “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger” (1982) at a modest 225 pages or so, but “The Dark Tower IV: Wizard and Glass” (1997) is went up to 887 pages, and the last one – “The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower” (2004) – stretched up to 845.

The fourth part of Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” saga, “Breaking Dawn” (2008), is well over 700 pages.

Some Indian writers are also eligible. Vikram Seth’s ‘A Decent Boy’ (1993) can reach 1,500 pages in some editions, while Vikram Chandra’s Mumbai detective saga, ‘Holy Games’ (2006), is nearly 1,000 pages or more, according to the editing.

Doorstops, in addition to satiating avid readers, can also serve as makeshift exercise equipment – simply holding them up to read will do wonders for hand and arm muscles and wrist flexibility, and even as a weapon, giving a whole new meaning to the “throw the book at” idiom.

Who said books are only for the mind?

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Doorstops: Books that offer physical exercise as well as mental training http://www.kundalini-support.com/doorstops-books-that-offer-physical-exercise-as-well-as-mental-training/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/doorstops-books-that-offer-physical-exercise-as-well-as-mental-training/ Residence ” General ” Art ” Doorstops: Books that offer physical exercise as well as mental training By Vikas Datta Some news portals may have a small blurb next to an article title that tells the reader how long it will take to read it – usually five minutes or less. The feature, which can […]]]>

By Vikas Datta

Some news portals may have a small blurb next to an article title that tells the reader how long it will take to read it – usually five minutes or less. The feature, which can also be found on some online editing tools, seems like a rather telling indictment of our contemporary time-stressed and hyper-regimented lives, but it’s unclear why it’s limited to reading. uniquely.


Assuming this trend is also transplanted into books? Will it work on what are known in the literary field as “door stoppers”, or works so thick and heavy, say over 500 to 1,000 pages or more, that they can be used as the eponymous article.

For such books, reading time will need to be measured in weeks or even months, and for casual, uncommitted readers, it could be up to a year.

While many leading comprehensive dictionaries, encyclopedias, and textbooks, from various fields of science to law to computer languages, are doorstops, the category is still common in fiction. These should be differentiated from omnibus editions in which two or three “medium” works by one author, or even more than one author, are printed together.

Door stops in fiction usually include what we call literary classics, say George Eliot’s “Middlemarch” (nearly 900 pages), or Count Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” (over 1,000 pages in most editions), or “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes. ” (nearly or more than 1,000 pages, depending on the edition).

They can also be about titanic conflicts between good and evil – everything from Alexandre Dumas’ great revenge saga “The Count of Monte Cristo” (over 1,000 pages in most editions) to the Harry Potter series (especially the last four episodes, with “The Order of the Phoenix” being 700 to 800 pages, depending on the edition), to great sweeps of history, spanning several generations, as by authors such than James Michener and James Clavell, or novels (Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone with the Wind”, 900-1,000 pages), or a mixture of everything, say MM Kaye’s “The Far Pavilions” (over 950 pages).

And you can count on them to have tons of characters – “The Count of Monte Cristo” starts with half a dozen and has three dozen major characters by the time it kicks into high gear. Others are not lacking and some helpfully have a list of characters, usually at the start, to help you keep track.

The advent of technology has made actual doorstops rather rare, as e-readers and tablets can accommodate multitudes of the bulkiest of books, saving avid readers the drudgery of lugging them around – although some aficionados still do. Owning them is also a mark of pride for avid librarians for the gravitas they bring to their shelves.

Let’s look at some door stops in different genres.

As mentioned, literary classics, such as Tolstoy – whose surname derives from the Russian word “tolstii” (meaning thick or big), or by his compatriot Fyodor Dostoyevsky, or others, such as Charles Dickens, Victor Hugo or Dumas, turn out to be door blockers, since they are paid by the page, and seem to have benefited from it. Most of their famous works began as serial episodes, so they didn’t consciously – one might assume – set out to write heavy tomes.

Dumas was a master. His “The Three Musketeers” is the first of three novels that make up the Romances D’Artagnan, and was followed by “Vingt Ans Après” – both are at least 700 pages and more in most editions. The last episode, “Le Vicomte de Bragelonne”, is usually divided into three or more books – the last being “The Man in the Iron Mask”, and each of them is over 700-800 pages.

Dickens was not far behind – of his 14 completed novels, eight, including ‘The Pickwick Papers’, ‘Nicholas Nickleby’, ‘David Copperfield’ and ‘Our Mutual Friend’ are well over 800 pages in most editions, and some extend to 1,000 pages plus with annotations and footnotes.

But the tradition continued beyond the 19th century.

JRR Tolkien’s epic high-fantasy adventure “The Lord of the Rings”, well-known because of the movies, is a great example of this.

Although Tolkien intended it to be published as one, it was eventually published in three volumes of two books each – ‘The Fellowship of the Ring’, ‘The Two Towers’ and ‘The Return of the King’ – between July 1954 and October 1955, for various reasons, such as paper shortages, high production costs, and publishers’ uncertainty about its reception.

Fortunately, the publishers then published it together – a special hardcover, illustrated edition that came out in 2021 included 1,248 pages each and a paperback, 1,216 pages.

Even before him was Kathleen Winsor’s hit historical romance “Forever Amber” (1944), set in mid-17th century England when the monarchy was restored under Charles II. It tells the story of Amber St. Clare, an orphan, who advances in society by sleeping and/or marrying successively wealthier and more important men, while nurturing her unattainable love. It was quickly censored by the Catholic Church, making it a bestseller.

What prevents the book, which is 992 pages in its Penguin paperback edition, from being a precursor to Jackie Collins or, say, Shobha De, is the meticulous historical research covering food and candy fashion, such as how the tea habit took hold of England, as well as contemporary politics and public disasters, including the plague and the Great Fire of London.

Austrian writer Robert Musil’s modernist work “The Man Without Qualities” (first published 1930 in German; 1953 in English) is a quasi-allegorical, existential – and satirical – look at the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Hungarian Habsburgs in its twilight period. , just before the First World War.

The main protagonist is a rather vague, ambivalent and indifferent mathematician named Ulrich, “the man without qualities”, who depends on the world to shape him. The work also shows how a celebration of international peace and imperial unity leads to national chauvinism, war and collapse.

It was unfinished, but the English version is over 1,150 pages, while the original German version is over 2,100.

After “full size” works such as the interracial love story “Sayonara” (1954) and the depiction of a radically different Afghanistan in “Caravans” (1963), Michener began producing doorstops with its multi-generational pageants set in a specific context. geographical area.

“Hawaii” (1959) is 1,136 pages in paperback; “The Source” (1965), where a team of archaeologists excavate a mound in Israel, and their story is interspersed with a narrative of each level they uncover, is 1,104 pages in paperback; “Caribbean” (1989), stretching from Columbus to Castro or thereabouts, is about 900 pages.

Several other works in this tradition, whether dealing with a specific U.S. state — Texas (1,472 pages), Alaska (1,152), or Colorado (1,104) — or countries like Poland (about 700 pages) or South Africa (1,200), are also heavy reads.

Francis Edward Wintle aka Edward Rutherfurd also follows the same pattern, traveling through the millennia of the region he dwells on, featuring many characters and not skimping on details. “Russka: The Novel of Russia” (1991) has 1,024 pages; “London” (1997), the history of the city from Roman times to the present day, covers 1,328 pages; and “New York” (900–1,050 pages in various paperback editions).

Clavell’s final four “Asian Saga” books are over 1,000 pages, including “Shogun” (1975), set in 1600s Japan, is 1,136 pages, and “Noble House” (1981), which is about Hong Kong in the 1960s, runs to 1,296 pages – although the latter, after an interlude in the past, is only a few days long.

The penchant for doorstops still persists.

Horror maestro Stephen King’s “Dark Tower” series began with “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger” (1982) at a modest 225 pages, but “The Dark Tower IV: Wizard and Glass” (1997) went up to 887 pages, and the latest — “The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower” (2004) — stretched to 845.

The fourth part of Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” saga, “Breaking Dawn” (2008), is well over 700 pages.

Some Indian writers are also eligible. Vikram Seth’s ‘A Decent Boy’ (1993) can reach 1,500 pages in some editions, while Vikram Chandra’s Mumbai detective saga, ‘Sacred Games’ (2006), is nearly 1,000 pages or more, according to the editing.

Doorstops, in addition to satiating avid readers, can also double as makeshift exercise equipment – simply holding them up to read will do wonders for hand and arm muscles and wrist flexibility , and even as a weapon, giving a whole new meaning to the “throwing” idiom. the book to”.

Who said books are only for the mind?

(Vikas Datta can be contacted at vikas.d@ians.in)

Source: IANS

Doorstops: Books that offer physical exercise as well as mental training

About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a programmer. He is editor of SocialNews.XYZ and president of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile apps and publishing topical news articles from various authenticated news sources.

As for writing, he enjoys writing about current world politics and Indian movies. His future plans include developing SocialNews.XYZ into a news website that has no bias or judgment towards any.

He can be reached at gopi@socialnews.xyz

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Sport, physical exercise and cardiac protection: medical prescription http://www.kundalini-support.com/sport-physical-exercise-and-cardiac-protection-medical-prescription/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 05:13:41 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/sport-physical-exercise-and-cardiac-protection-medical-prescription/ Dubai: Sajeev Kaura, an Indian expatriate in Dubai and senior commercial director of an international organization, now 55, was only 41 when he suffered a heart attack. An extremely fit person with an ideal weight range, he ran five times a week, covering almost 5-6 km each day at an average speed of 10 km/h […]]]>

Dubai: Sajeev Kaura, an Indian expatriate in Dubai and senior commercial director of an international organization, now 55, was only 41 when he suffered a heart attack. An extremely fit person with an ideal weight range, he ran five times a week, covering almost 5-6 km each day at an average speed of 10 km/h and played golf each week.

Recounting his experience, Kaura said: “I was then stationed in Johannesburg, South Africa. This happened on a Sunday when I was visiting a friend for lunch. I suddenly felt a pain in my left arm which spread to my back. I was sweating and uncomfortable, but I thought the incident would pass. But within minutes I felt I had to go to the hospital.

He was taken to the emergency room by his friend where the doctor diagnosed that he was in the middle of a heart attack. “I was surprised because I was still super fit and healthy and I was only 41,” said Kaura, who had to undergo angioplasty to place a stent in her main artery.

Indian expat Sajeev Kaura, now 55, was just 41 when he suffered a heart attack.
Image Credit: Supplied

Family history, smoking habit

The reason Kaura suffered a heart attack could be attributed to her family history of heart disease and her habit of smoking, doctors said. “Those are the only two questions the doctor asked me. My dad who was a non-smoker had his first heart attack at 44. Here I was smoking about 10 cigarettes a day and it would have caused my main artery to thicken. Angioplasty and a stent later, I felt great,” Kaura said.

Since the incident, Kaura has completely quit smoking and has been on her fitness routine. “I continue to run five times a week, play golf once a week and eat healthy. Two years ago, I ran the Ras Al Khaimah half marathon. My weight has always been stable. The only thing that’s different is that I now have regular health and heart checkups, once every six months. Being physically fit probably saved me when I had a heart attack because my doctor said it could have been worse,” Kaura added.

What Kaura went through is not an isolated case. There have been many cases over the past two years of people collapsing with sudden cardiac arrest or suffering from an irregular heartbeat and in many cases with fatal consequences. But what are the risks involved?

The importance of healthy physical activity

While doctors agree that physical exertion and an exercise program are the best ways to stay healthy, cardiologists say you have to figure out how much is too much.

Dr Abdul Rahuman Aboobaker

Dr Abdul Rahuman Aboobaker, Consultant Cardiologist at Thumbay Hospital, Fujairah, explained: “Regular exercise is one of the most important recommendations for maintaining good health, but very vigorous exercise can sometimes lead to heart attack. myocardium (MI), arrhythmia and sudden death. ”

He said: “The most important cause of exercise-related cardiac events is related to coronary artery disease (CAD) or atherosclerosis. It involves the blockage of the main arteries of the heart supplying oxygenated blood. Although the buildup occurs very slowly and the disease is said to kill silently, an atherosclerotic plaque can rupture at any time and produce an acute blockage of the coronary artery. Triggers could be a smoking habit, physical or mental stress. Stress is again something that cannot be quantified and its impact varies from individual to individual. The stress of physical exercise is different according to age and depends on the physical state of each one.

Ajay Chaturvedi

Ajay Chaturvedi, a health sector personnel who is Basic Life Support (BLS) qualified and trained to give advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in emergencies, said that as a BLS trained official, he had worked closely with cases where people had suffered a sudden irregular heartbeat or heart attack.

He said: “Angina from exercise is a common occurrence. The added strain in the case of a person who may have a blocked artery can trigger excessive strain on the heart muscle and lead to complete blockage of the artery triggering cardiac arrest. Most people who are young never think they may have CVD and may overlook symptoms such as excessive sweating, nausea and dizziness. They assume it is due to strenuous exercise or weight lifting, when it may actually be happening because they are having a heart attack.

Prevention is therefore better than cure.

Fitness experts say it’s important to build up your fitness slowly and gradually and not go into sudden exertion.

There should be a regular program of stretching, breathing, and training, followed by an elaborate cooling down process that will help prevent any kind of heart fatigue.

Dr Aboobaker said: “One should follow the rule of exercising regularly without forcing too much. Individuals should follow the general rule of having regular medical checks. Knowing your body and how much you can stretch is the key requirement before starting high intensity workouts. Moreover, there is no single strategy. More often than not, people who exercise irregularly and later compensate with vigorous workouts to make up for missed periods are the ones who face health issues. Physical exercise should be categorized as beginner, intermediate and advanced [to avoid over-exhaustion].”

If the body develops a fever or an infection such as COVID-19, one should wait for full recovery before beginning any exercise. It is advisable to start an exercise regimen, at least two weeks after full recovery and this too graduated exercise.

Know the Symptoms

If you are exercising and experience any of the following symptoms, stop exercising immediately and seek medical attention. Heaviness, chest pain, difficulty breathing, unusual sweating, lightheadedness, lightheadedness, and heart rhythm abnormalities are some of the red flags.

Have a medical evaluation every year

Anyone considering an exercise program who is over 40 should ideally consult their doctor, Dr. Aboobaker advised. The person must undergo an electrocardiogram and blood tests to find risk factors for coronary artery disease, diabetes, cholesterol, creatinine, etc. If a person has a family history of heart disease or has occasionally suffered from shortness of breath, palpitations, he should undergo an echocardiograph and a treadmill test. In high-risk people with heart disease or sudden death in the family, coronary CT angiography is also recommended.

Sport and heart health

Dr. Naeem Tareen, a leading cardiologist in the United Arab Emirates, those who play sports should also be aware of their heart health.

American Board Certified Cardiologist and Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and Head of the American Heart Center in Dubai Healthcare City, Dr Tareen said even professional athletes tend to lose their fitness once ‘they no longer play active sports and may end up suffering from heart problems. ailments.

Dr Naeem Tareen

“My message is that everyone, including athletes and cricketers, should have regular checkups and undergo echocardiograms and electrocardiographic stress test lipid profiles, in addition to following a healthy lifestyle.” , said Dr. Tareen.

He said professional athletes are more likely to suffer from heart disease after retirement because they don’t tend to exercise like they used to.

He said it was important for the general public to see a cardiologist immediately if they experience chest discomfort or heaviness in their chest or shortness of breath when exercising or playing sports.

“At first it happens after exertion or exercise. Some people have indigestion or pain in the left arm or pain or discomfort in the jaw. All of these are warning signs and should not be ignored. People in general should watch their weight, quit smoking or shisha, they should also watch their lipids, ie cholesterol, triglycerides and especially good and bad cholesterol.

Dr Tareen said it was important for people to have tight blood sugar control as well because diabetes is a major risk factor. Blood pressure should also be well controlled.

He said lack of exercise is also a risk factor. “I advise my patients to walk daily. Everyone should have annual checkups.

What if you feel discomfort during exercise?

• Stop exercising immediately and call the medical emergency number 999.

• Do not ignore or ignore any visible signs of discomfort such as arm pain, malaise, palpitations, nausea, or dizziness.

• Inform reception and ask for assistance. If the gym has a paramedic on call who knows how to administer CPR, ask for help.

• Call or notify family members; if you have a doctor, call him.

• Open the windows and lie down.

• Loosen your clothes and try to breathe deeply.

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You could live longer by simply applying one physical exercise per week http://www.kundalini-support.com/you-could-live-longer-by-simply-applying-one-physical-exercise-per-week/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/you-could-live-longer-by-simply-applying-one-physical-exercise-per-week/ A huge paradox is that despite the fact that most of us don’t like the idea of ​​growing old, we also hope to live as long as possible. But if, by chance, someone among you discovers the secret of eternal youth, do not keep it to yourself! You are free to share it with the […]]]>

A huge paradox is that despite the fact that most of us don’t like the idea of ​​growing old, we also hope to live as long as possible. But if, by chance, someone among you discovers the secret of eternal youth, do not keep it to yourself! You are free to share it with the world in the comments section of this article.

Doctors had often told us all how to do our best to try to live a long life. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, exercising, getting enough sleep, or avoiding alcohol, drugs, and smoking are all on the list. But for those smart guys who bring us such advice, updates always appear.

Strengthening exercises are the key

CNN is telling the world about new research recently published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine that might shock you. It reveals that 30 to 60 minutes a day of strength-related exercise each week will reduce the risk of premature death from all causes by 10 to 20 percent. In addition, the risk of having to deal with diabetes, heart disease or cancer also decreases in the case of those who are physically active.

If you want even more health benefits, you can choose to add any amount of aerobic activity to these strength workouts. This combination will grant you a 40% lower risk of premature death, a 28% lower risk of cancer-related death, and a 46% lower incidence of heart disease.

It’s no secret that almost any type of strength training exercise is good for your health, no matter how much. Dr. William Roberts of the University of Minnesota explained in an email that CNN quotes:

You don’t need to train for the marathon to be healthy and improve your health,

A combination of 5-10 minutes of strength training and 30 minutes of walking most days of the week will yield great health benefits for people.

Are you ready to do more strength exercises?

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Physical exercise protects brain health in older adults http://www.kundalini-support.com/physical-exercise-protects-brain-health-in-older-adults/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/physical-exercise-protects-brain-health-in-older-adults/ An international research team has shed light on the biological processes involved in the beneficial effect of physical exercise on cognitive abilities and mental health. As published in the journal Alzheimer’s and dementiathe team found that exercise increases levels of certain proteins known to enhance communication between brain cells across synapses, which may be a […]]]>
Physical exercise protects brain health in older adults

An international research team has shed light on the biological processes involved in the beneficial effect of physical exercise on cognitive abilities and mental health. As published in the journal Alzheimer’s and dementiathe team found that exercise increases levels of certain proteins known to enhance communication between brain cells across synapses, which may be a key factor in keeping dementia at bay.

In order to support healthy brain aging in older adults, various lifestyle changes are generally recommended, such as adopting a more balanced diet, boosting routine cognitive activities, and spending more time in physical exercise. This recommendation is based on epidemiological observations which support that physical activity is associated with a lower incidence of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, and it is estimated that sedentary lifestyles may account for more than four million cases of dementia each year.

“Several clinical trials in which moderate physical exercise was included as a therapy showed a positive effect on both cognition and cortical thickness,” noted study co-author Alfredo Ramos-Miguel, researcher at the University of the Basque Country. Additionally, preclinical studies in animal models have suggested that physical exercise may improve cognitive abilities by increasing synaptogenesis, i.e. the generation of new neural connections. But according to Ramos-Miguel, “the difficulty of performing molecular studies in the human brain limits the possibilities of finding the biological mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of physical exercise on mental and cognitive health during aging”.

To establish the anatomo-pathological and molecular bases of cognitive and psychomotor decline, the Memory and Aging Project (MAP) of the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center has been conducting since 1997 a longitudinal study with volunteers who agree to undergo periodic cognitive and psychomotor assessments and to donate their organs for scientific purposes after their death. This makes it possible to directly correlate daily habits and health states with structural and functional alterations in participants’ brains.

The latest publication of this project presents the results of 404 people whose physical activity was monitored with a wristwatch or wristband activity meters for an average of 3.5 years ante-mortem. After death, samples were taken from up to 12 brain areas critical for cognitive and psychomotor skills; quantitative and functional analyzes of eight synaptic proteins were performed on these samples, and a comprehensive histopathological evaluation, which examines 10 neuropathologies associated with aging, was performed.

The results confirmed that higher levels of daily physical activity are associated at all levels with an enrichment in the quantity and functionality of all synaptic proteins analyzed. This association was more pronounced in brain regions related to motor control, such as the caudate nucleus and putamen. Moreover, the relationship between physical exercise and synaptic density was independent of both the neuropathological load found in the same brain areas and the presence of pathologies affecting motor skills, indicating that physical activity can be beneficial for all. elderly person regardless of their state of health. Actigraphy data also indicated that the beneficial effects of physical exercise are highly volatile, as participants with a high physical routine in early life who discontinued this habit in the last two years of life had synaptic densities similar to those seen in more sedentary participants.

“This study shows, for the first time in humans, that physical exercise, even at advanced age, contributes either to promoting the processes of synaptogenesis or to increasing synaptic resilience against the deleterious effects of neuropathological lesions”, said Ramos-Miguel.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/Mladen

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Effects of physical exercise on body composition and conditional physical abilities of schoolchildren during COVID-19 confinement http://www.kundalini-support.com/effects-of-physical-exercise-on-body-composition-and-conditional-physical-abilities-of-schoolchildren-during-covid-19-confinement/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/effects-of-physical-exercise-on-body-composition-and-conditional-physical-abilities-of-schoolchildren-during-covid-19-confinement/ This article was originally published here Glob Pediatric Health. 22 Jan 2022;9:2333794X211062440. doi: 10.1177/2333794X211062440. eCollection 2022. ABSTRACT As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, most countries have announced the temporary closure of schools, opting to continue classes virtually, affecting children’s lifestyles, mainly by reducing the practice of physical activity and sport, which becomes a risk […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Glob Pediatric Health. 22 Jan 2022;9:2333794X211062440. doi: 10.1177/2333794X211062440. eCollection 2022.

ABSTRACT

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, most countries have announced the temporary closure of schools, opting to continue classes virtually, affecting children’s lifestyles, mainly by reducing the practice of physical activity and sport, which becomes a risk factor for the development of obesity and overweight. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of physical exercise on the body composition of a sample of school-aged children during the COVID-19 confinement. A quantitative approach study and a quasi-experimental design with pre-test and post-test. The sample consisted of 70 school-age children aged 8 to 12 who were randomly assigned to 2 groups: the experimental group (GE: 35), which received an aerobic and anaerobic physical exercise program 3 times per day. With a duration of 60 minutes for 10 weeks virtually and a control group (CG: 35) who only received the physical education class. Although pre-test post-test measures showed favorable changes in body composition, weight, and conditional abilities (speed and jumping), these were not statistically significant (P < .05). A structured physical exercise program through virtuality for school children can be a strategy to control overweight and obesity in children during confinement and improve their conditional physical abilities (speed, jump).

PMID:35097162 | PMC: PMC8796106 | DOI:10.1177/2333794X211062440

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Keep fit with an exercise program – Alzheimer’s News Today http://www.kundalini-support.com/keep-fit-with-an-exercise-program-alzheimers-news-today/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/keep-fit-with-an-exercise-program-alzheimers-news-today/ Caregiving is tough, so if you’re a caregiver and haven’t started an exercise routine, don’t put it off. Better yet, introduce your loved one to an exercise program as well. No one needs another reminder of the benefits of exercise – they’re as common as TV commercials for storage bins at the start of the […]]]>

Caregiving is tough, so if you’re a caregiver and haven’t started an exercise routine, don’t put it off. Better yet, introduce your loved one to an exercise program as well.

No one needs another reminder of the benefits of exercise – they’re as common as TV commercials for storage bins at the start of the New Year. However, in this last week of January, I would like to encourage caregivers to get in shape and help loved ones engage in a fitness program as much as their physical and cognitive limitations allow.

Caregivers must perform activities that require strength every day, especially if the person they are caring for is bedridden or has physical limitations that prevent them from getting into bed and getting up, getting up from a chair or walk unaided. A strong core will support caregivers as they participate in these tasks.

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Keeping fit and helping the care recipient to look their best will lead to fewer accidents, such as a fall at home.

It helps, of course, if a patient or loved one has some core strength. If they had a healthy lifestyle before a diagnosis of dementia, for example, and exercised regularly, it may be easier to convince them to stay physically strong by involving them in an exercise routine. daily.

But it’s easy for people with Alzheimer’s disease, even in the early stages, to become complacent about exercise and other activities they once enjoyed. Convincing them to move can be difficult. Someone who loses interest in what once turned them on is a symptom of the disease.

Also, older people may find it easier to sit and do nothing since their bones and muscles are sore from aging. As with Alzheimer’s disease, there is a link between age and osteoarthritis, the most common form of “wear and tear” arthritis, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the majority of people who are diagnosed with arthritis are under the age of 65, the risk of being diagnosed with the disease increases with age. So while age isn’t the only contributing factor, almost 50% of people over 65 report “doctor-diagnosed” arthritis.

Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the hands, knees and hips. It’s no wonder, then, that someone with the disease avoids working painful and swollen joints.

But caregivers shouldn’t give them a pass. Caregivers should speak with their healthcare provider or have a physical therapist assess a patient or loved one’s condition before beginning an exercise program.


To note: Alzheimer’s news today is strictly a disease news and information site. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking it because of anything you read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Alzheimer’s news today or its parent company, BioNews, and aim to spark discussion about Alzheimer’s disease issues.

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COVID-19 Alert: Exercise is a way to achieve good health and general well-being http://www.kundalini-support.com/covid-19-alert-exercise-is-a-way-to-achieve-good-health-and-general-well-being/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/covid-19-alert-exercise-is-a-way-to-achieve-good-health-and-general-well-being/ The benefits of exercise and physical activity have been proven throughout life. We need to keep moving, and most of our body systems function efficiently when we are constantly physically active. By IAS Agent (Dr.) Heera Lal and Robin Singh The COVID-19 pandemic means that many of us are housebound and resting more than usual. […]]]>

The benefits of exercise and physical activity have been proven throughout life. We need to keep moving, and most of our body systems function efficiently when we are constantly physically active.

By IAS Agent (Dr.) Heera Lal and Robin Singh

The COVID-19 pandemic means that many of us are housebound and resting more than usual. It is difficult for many of us to do the kind of physical exercise that we usually do. It’s even harder for people who don’t usually exercise. But it is extremely important for people of all ages and abilities to be as active as possible. Even the World Health Organization’s (WHO) “Be Active” campaign aims to help you do just that – and have fun at the same time.

Why should we focus on fitness in the midst of what, in many circumstances, has gone into survival mode? Regular physical exercise benefits both body and mind. The benefits of exercise and physical activity have been proven throughout life. We need to keep moving, and most of our body systems function efficiently when we are constantly physically active.

Strength training has been shown to lessen signs of anxiety in people with and without anxiety syndrome.

For children and youth, light to active physical exercise during the day is correlated with increased self-esteem, better concentration, fewer depressive disorders and improved sleep.

For adults and seniors with prolonged health issues, regular walks are recommended. The benefits of strength training may be even greater in older adults for improving quality of life and efficient functioning.

The strong recommendation is to identify the physical exercises you enjoy and share your experiences with others. Additionally, there is a testimonial that implies that exercise can be effective for mood even if doing it is not as pleasant.

We are already facing additional stress associated with the growth of the COVID-19 pandemic and its potential to scare our health. It is strongly advised that you consider using exercise and activity as a strategy to maintain wellness during this worrying time.

Although various factors seem beyond our control now, we have the power to be productive and incorporate physical exercise into our daily lives. We can even look back on this difficult time as the turning point where we realized new ways to build our emotional strength and physical resilience.

Physical training builds muscle and bone strength, improves balance, fitness and flexibility. It’s also good for our mental health – reducing the risk of depression, cognitive deterioration and delaying the onset of dementia – and improving overall well-being.

Staying home for a long period of time can be a significant challenge to staying physically active. Inactive behavior and negligible levels of physical exercise can have adverse effects on people’s well-being, health and quality of life. Even self-isolation can also trigger additional stress and challenge the psychological health of individuals. Exercise and relaxation practices can be beneficial ways to help us stay relaxed and can continue to protect our health during this time. In fact, physical inactivity is correlated with a high risk of critical consequences from COVID-19. Moreover, we are faced with the certainty that the virus is not going away anytime soon.

The columnist is IAS Agent (Dr) Heera Lal, Additional Mission Director – UP National Health Mission and Robin Singh, Founder, Team_Fighersspeed. The opinions expressed are their own.

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