Meditation – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:46:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.kundalini-support.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-favicon-4-32x32.png Meditation – Kundalini Support http://www.kundalini-support.com/ 32 32 Review of the film Wood and Water: a meditation on age and motherhood http://www.kundalini-support.com/review-of-the-film-wood-and-water-a-meditation-on-age-and-motherhood/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 14:03:22 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/review-of-the-film-wood-and-water-a-meditation-on-age-and-motherhood/ Review at a glance W Oood and Water is the first feature film by German writer and director Jonas Bak, with a slow but moving soundtrack by Brian Eno. It tells the story of Anke (Anke Bak), a recently retired woman living in rural Germany who calls all of her children home to come and […]]]>
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Oood and Water is the first feature film by German writer and director Jonas Bak, with a slow but moving soundtrack by Brian Eno. It tells the story of Anke (Anke Bak), a recently retired woman living in rural Germany who calls all of her children home to come and celebrate the start of this new chapter in her life. At the last minute, her son Max, who lives in Hong Kong and hasn’t been in three years, cancels, saying he’s stuck there due to pro-democracy protests.

Eventually, bored with all of her new free time, Anke decides to go to Hong Kong amid the protests to try and visit her son. Wood and Water follows her journey, as she abandons the familiar world of her domestic life in Germany’s Black Forest region for the new perspectives she finds in Hong Kong.

You might expect a shoot during a series of heated political protests to be high-intensity. Wood and water is no such thing. It can be described as smooth, both in rhythm and in plot.

While in Hong Kong, Anke encounters a series of characters, from two young Australian travelers on their last night on the town to an old Chinese fortune teller, forging a particularly close bond with the security of the building’s caretaker. Max, where she resides during her stay despite her unexpected absence (we never meet him).

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Most of the time, that leisurely pace is a real strength, but there are times during the film’s 85 minutes where, alongside the lack of plot, minimal storyline, and very low-key acting, he can start to feel like he does. appear dull and stagnant. Although this is already a short film, there are times when the camera lingers for a second or two too long on a still shot.

Still, the film is beautiful and deals well with ideas of aging and intercultural relationships, though less completely or effectively with themes such as motherhood and politics, which feels like a missed opportunity. Sometimes Bak’s execution is lacking – some moments seem trivial, and despite many beautiful scenes, sometimes the movie goes so slowly that it starts to get monotonous. Ultimately, this is a character observation and, as such, a moving portrayal of a woman who discovers herself late.


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Richard Reiss: Giving Thought – A Meditation on American Generosity | Chroniclers http://www.kundalini-support.com/richard-reiss-giving-thought-a-meditation-on-american-generosity-chroniclers/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/richard-reiss-giving-thought-a-meditation-on-american-generosity-chroniclers/ In the early 1980s, I was an employee of the Boy Scouts of America. My title was district executive. I was responsible for organizing the new Scout Troops, Cub Packs and Explorer positions. I also provided leadership support and training to troops, packs and positions already in place. It was a really good job for […]]]>

In the early 1980s, I was an employee of the Boy Scouts of America. My title was district executive. I was responsible for organizing the new Scout Troops, Cub Packs and Explorer positions. I also provided leadership support and training to troops, packs and positions already in place. It was a really good job for someone who had just graduated from college. Hours were flexible, I had a company car and I was paid to sleep in a tent occasionally in the woods. What could be better for someone who has no interest in sitting at a desk?

The other part of the job, the part that could make or break a career, was fundraising. At the time, I knew as much about fundraising as I did about open heart surgery, meaning I didn’t know anything. Nonetheless, I was friendly, not afraid to ask, and a decent listener. I started to understand.

I don’t know exactly when the bulb flashed, but between 1983 and 1985 I realized that I wasn’t going to work for the BSA forever. Instead, I decided to become a professional fundraiser. It was something I was comfortable doing, but more than that, it was common sense. The government, under President Ronald Reagan, was cutting or cutting funding for a long list of social services and other government-funded programs.

These vital programs and organizations were not about to disappear. They would do whatever is necessary to continue their good work. They would quickly learn that their future survival depended on the generosity of others. And they would need someone – someone like me – to find, cultivate, and solicit potential donors who would allow them to continue doing what they were doing so well.

I think about it now, walking to my mailbox on a cool Berkshire day, as the new year has just begun. As I open the little green letterbox door, I notice that there are no letters asking for end of year donations. A week ago there would have been at least half a dozen, and certainly well over a hundred for the month of December. That’s a lot of requests and, even as a fundraiser, I’m happy to see the flurry of requests come to an end, if only temporarily.

Six months from now, when the data becomes available, we will know how generous Americans were in 2021. I can tell you now that will be a big number. In 2020, donations to all charities in the United States totaled $ 471 billion, of which 69% came directly from individuals.

As a nation, we should feel good about our generosity. For the most part, it’s a beautiful expression of selflessness, and no other country on the planet comes close to this level of charitable giving. Even so, I can’t help but think that a critical force driving philanthropy over the years has been the government’s ability to back away from its commitments to education, social services, health care, arts and our most vulnerable citizens.

Did you know that there are over 1.5 million nonprofits in the United States? They all fundraise and I’m glad my career can help fill a need. But as someone who has spent most of their working life in higher education, I have found that whenever public funding for colleges and universities goes down, those same colleges and universities will step up their fundraising activities. .

Philanthropy can be wonderful and transformational. I have never felt so good in my career as when a major donor thanked me for helping to create a joyful giving experience. Yet in the back of my mind I have often thought that much of this work would not have been necessary if the government had better fulfilled its basic functions.

Philanthropy dates back to the Bible, and wealthy donors often cite a passage from the Bible regarding personal generosity. Luke 12:48: “For whoever is given much, much will be asked of him. “

Of course, donate to the charity of your choice and give to the best of your ability. But the next time you hear about the government raising taxes to help support schools, the arts, or mental health programs, think about who you’re giving a lot to. No one gets more than Uncle Sam and it wouldn’t hurt Uncle Sam to have a bigger heart. And maybe, just maybe, our mailboxes will all be a little lighter next year.

Richard Reiss is the author of “Desperate love: memory of a father”. He lives in Canaan, NY, with his wife Paula. He can be reached at rpreiss63@gmail.com.


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Meditation for a new you in the new year http://www.kundalini-support.com/meditation-for-a-new-you-in-the-new-year/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 20:43:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/meditation-for-a-new-you-in-the-new-year/ December 28, 2021 ASU neuroscientist says good meditation can improve cognitive performance and reduce stress New year, new you. But what’s the best way to approach the new you? Arizona State University neuroscientist says it’s meditation. But not just any genre. Yi-Yuan Tang has been studying the brain for over 30 years. He says that […]]]>
December 28, 2021

ASU neuroscientist says good meditation can improve cognitive performance and reduce stress

New year, new you.

But what’s the best way to approach the new you?

Arizona State University neuroscientist says it’s meditation.

But not just any genre.

Yi-Yuan Tang has been studying the brain for over 30 years. He says that after just five to ten sessions of meditation, your brain can change for the better, providing a host of benefits.

When Tang started his career 30 years ago in medical school, the emphasis was on the Western approach to medicine: drugs and surgery.

“But it doesn’t always work for sure,” said Tang, a professor at the College of Health Solutions. “Then I discovered another important factor that we ignore: the psychological contribution to health and disease. So this time, I studied psychosomatic medicine. I have discovered many psychological factors that contribute to health and illness. So I had a question: can we help the patient with this kind of approach?

When Tang was six years old, he had a serious accident. He fell from a third floor, breaking his legs and feet. They got infected. Doctors at the hospital couldn’t cure him and gave up. Her father, a teacher, found a doctor of traditional medicine who cured Tang. This doctor became one of Tang’s first teachers.

Tang then learned different body-mind methods and techniques from over 20 teachers. He has long practiced many Eastern traditions, including traditional Chinese medicine, meditation, tai chi, martial arts, and I Ching.

Tang has also studied health, disease, psychology, and neuroscience, and has developed an approach he calls integrative mind-body training. It focuses on the body part of physical health and, to a lesser extent, mental health.

“Our brains can predict our health,” he said.

Tang studied the effects of integrative mind-body training on a population of 10,000 people. They improved their emotions, attention and creativity, and also reduced stress and improved other functions.

So what happens to the brain after the five to ten sessions of meditation?

“Five sessions can improve brain activity in an area of ​​stress, area of ​​emotion, area of ​​reward, and area of ​​self-control, typically in the middle of our brain,” he said. “After 10 sessions, we notice that this area is getting bigger. The emotional reward is greater.

It’s not exercise, Tang said. It is calm and peaceful. It is an experience that changes and shapes the brain.

“Participants have better cognitive performance, such as attention, memory, creativity, problem solving,” he said. “The stress is lower and the immunity is higher.”

If immune function can be improved for middle-aged and elderly people, the quality of life can be improved and stress reduced.

“We can prevent… early chronic decline and aging-related disorders,” he said.

What type of meditation is the best?

He recommends brain and body based practices like mindfulness meditation, tai chi, yoga, and qigong.

At the heart of his work is embodied cognition theory, the idea that many characteristics of cognition, whether human or otherwise, are shaped by aspects of the entire body of the organism.

“It means how your body can work with your brain… to change our state,” he said.

Tang is the author of nine books, such as “The Neuroscience of Mindfulness Meditation: How the Body and Mind Work Together to Change Our Behavior” (Springer Nature, 2017), “Brain-Based Learning and Education: Principle and Practice” ( Academic Press, Elsevier, 2018) and “The Neuroscience of Meditation: Understanding Individual Differences” (Academic Press, Elsevier, 2020).

Top image: Professor Yi-Yuan Tang from the College of Health Solutions. Tang’s research focuses on the brain and how it evolves and changes with mindfulness practices. Photo by Deanna Dent / ASU News


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Ask Joan: The Benefits of Meditation | News http://www.kundalini-support.com/ask-joan-the-benefits-of-meditation-news/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 06:02:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/ask-joan-the-benefits-of-meditation-news/ Question: I’ve found that I’ve been getting more and more anxious lately, and some of my friends have recommended meditation. I don’t know much about it, but I’ve heard that it is getting more and more popular. Is this something worth exploring? Responnse: This season is a time when many people celebrate by writing a […]]]>

Question: I’ve found that I’ve been getting more and more anxious lately, and some of my friends have recommended meditation. I don’t know much about it, but I’ve heard that it is getting more and more popular. Is this something worth exploring?

Responnse: This season is a time when many people celebrate by writing a list of resolutions, often related to a healthy lifestyle. and a healthy habit that more and more people are adding to their lives is meditation.

Meditation has been around for thousands of years, in various forms, across the world, according to the Mayo Clinic. Meditation is now recognized as a body-mind activity that can reduce stress and promote relaxation.

In general, meditation involves focusing your attention and avoiding the continuous flow of ideas, impulses, and worries that often invade our minds. It can offer benefits that last long after a specific meditation session ends, helping people approach the rest of the day with cool calm and clarity. The Mayo Clinic reports that it has been found to relieve symptoms of certain medical conditions, including anxiety, asthma, sleep problems, tension headaches, and high blood pressure.

Meditation often involves the following:

• Focused attention: it is focusing on a specific object, an image, a word / phrase (mantra) or a breath.

• Relaxed breathing: This involves breathing slowly, deep and evenly, using the diaphragm to dilate the lungs and absorb more oxygen.

• Maintain an open attitude: Practice letting thoughts in and out of the mind without judging them.

Yoga is also a form of meditation. It requires balance and focus, which helps people who practice it to focus more on the present, instead of dwelling on current events or a to-do list.

Our own Center of Excellence for Healthy Living offers free evidence-based workshops that teach or integrate meditation practices including Tai Ji Quan and Tai Chi.

• Tai Ji Quan: Move for Better Balance is a training program designed for the elderly or anyone with balance problems. The workshop meets in one hour sessions, twice a week, for 24 weeks.

• Tai Chi focuses on preventing falls and improving balance through a gentle form of a Chinese martial art that includes a series of movements performed as a slow-motion dance in conjunction with deep breathing. The Tai Chi workshop meets for one hour, twice a week, for 12 weeks.

For more information on these and other HLCE workshops, visit our website at https://agespan.org/solutions/health-wellness/

By exploring these and other options, you can find a form of meditation that is right for you. I wish you the best for 2022.

Do you have difficulty caring for an elderly person or are you having difficulty finding resources? Our experienced staff are available to assist you. Visit us online at www.agespan.org for more information. You can also call us at 800-892-0890 or email info@agespan.org. Joan Hatem-Roy is the Executive Director of AgeSpan, formerly Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley and North Shore.


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My Screen Life: Universal’s Veronika Kwan Vandenberg on meditation, mentors and where she wants to be in five years | Characteristics http://www.kundalini-support.com/my-screen-life-universals-veronika-kwan-vandenberg-on-meditation-mentors-and-where-she-wants-to-be-in-five-years-characteristics/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 15:07:46 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/my-screen-life-universals-veronika-kwan-vandenberg-on-meditation-mentors-and-where-she-wants-to-be-in-five-years-characteristics/ Los Angeles-based Veronika Kwan Vandenberg joined Universal Pictures International (UPI) as President of International Distribution in June 2020 after nearly 30 years at Warner Bros. At UPI, she spearheaded global blockbuster releases. Fast & Furious 9 and No time to die, and is now strategizing for campaigns for award nominees, including Belfast, Gucci House, Cyrano […]]]>

Los Angeles-based Veronika Kwan Vandenberg joined Universal Pictures International (UPI) as President of International Distribution in June 2020 after nearly 30 years at Warner Bros. At UPI, she spearheaded global blockbuster releases. Fast & Furious 9 and No time to die, and is now strategizing for campaigns for award nominees, including Belfast, Gucci House, Cyrano and Licorice Pizza, as well as the Christmas rollout of Sing 2. All this in view of the summer 2022 releases Jurassic World: Domination and Minions: The Rise of Gru.

No wonder she likes to meditate.

How is your office?

I work in a small space with wide open doors leading to the back garden. I have a monstrous desk with a crank that my husband made from a vintage drafting table. Behind me is a Timothy Oulton shelf with movie memorabilia and books as well as crystals and photographs. There is also a large vintage Italian poster of Cat on a hot tin roof. Oh, and a Peloton treadmill that I never use.

What’s the first thing you do every day when you walk into your office?

I start the working day long before I get to my office. I get my emails straight away, then I start my morning routine and get my daughter ready for school. By the time I arrive at my office, I am ready to begin my meetings. I drink a lot of green juices and chai latte.

What was your first job in the movie industry?

As a marketing intern at Lorimar in the international film department. I was an international student at Loyola Marymount University [in Los Angeles] and was interested in staying and working in the creative industries and had a friend who worked in Lorimar. It was a long process to get started, get my work visa, and be offered a job with Warner Bros as a sales analyst intern.

Who do you admire in the industry and why?

I have always admired Donna Langley [chairman, Universal Filmed Entertainment Group] from afar and now I can see her in action. You want to do well by it. At the time, my biggest mentor was Alan Horn [former president and COO of Warner Bros]. He set an example, was courteous to filmmakers and executives, cared about the quality of the work and treated everyone with respect.

Who helped you the most when you started out?

My first boss at Warner Bros was Ed Frumkes. He taught me everything about the trade. He made me sit with him for hours, listening to his conversations. He gave me a huge amount of responsibility from the start and he let me go with it.

What was your favorite movie growing up?

I grew up overseas, so all of the movies came to us later than in the States. I was born in Hong Kong then I lived in Lebanon. From there we went to Germany and then I spent some time in Bahrain. I went to boarding school in France and graduated from high school in Amsterdam. My mother is German and my father is Chinese and my stepfather was Lebanese. I loved spaghetti westerns, Once upon a Time in the West was one of my favorites. When I lived in Hong Kong, Imposing Hell came to the movies and it was my first experience of a popcorn blockbuster.

Who would you most like to meet with?

Barack Obama.

Where do you want to be in five years?

On a spiritual quest across the world. I like to meditate and do yoga. It has always been my dream to get away from it all and spend a long time immersed in different cultures, spiritual settings, hiking on faraway paths. You never find time in life because of work, family and children in school.

What excites you about the future of the company?

The changing landscape. The job hasn’t changed for a long time and we live in an era that allows us to try new things.

What is the biggest challenge facing the business?

Restore cinema habits, bring customers back to the cinema.

What job would you do if you weren’t working in the cinema?

I would probably write. I wrote a lot when I was young. I always have a lot of stories in my head.

What’s the TV series everyone should watch this year?

My recent favorites are Ted lasso and See, with Jason Momoa.

What are you doing to relax?

I meditate. I take long walks with my dog ​​and my husband. We had a puppy during Covid and it’s my little baby. He’s a golden retriever.

Who would you play in the biopic of your life and who would lead it?

Sandra Bullock, with a lot of comedy, and Nancy Meyers in the direction.


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New Meditation on Healthy Lungs Helps People Fight COVID-19 Coronavirus http://www.kundalini-support.com/new-meditation-on-healthy-lungs-helps-people-fight-covid-19-coronavirus/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 14:39:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/new-meditation-on-healthy-lungs-helps-people-fight-covid-19-coronavirus/ SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, USA, December 21, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – The new method of meditation combines ancient Chinese meditation Qi Gong with Tai Chi movement to improve people’s immune systems and strengthen the functionality of their lungs. Since its first cases at the end of 2019, the coronavirus has infected more than 250 million people […]]]>

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, USA, December 21, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – The new method of meditation combines ancient Chinese meditation Qi Gong with Tai Chi movement to improve people’s immune systems and strengthen the functionality of their lungs.

Since its first cases at the end of 2019, the coronavirus has infected more than 250 million people and caused more than 5 million devastating deaths worldwide. Now, the newer variants of COVID-19, especially the Delta and Omicron variants, are increasingly contagious, even to people who have received a double vaccination. With the holiday season approaching, we may be looking at another epidemic due to the large gatherings over the holiday season.

In order to help people fight COVID-19 and its newer variants, meditation expert YiChen Master has developed a new method of meditation, Qian Yuan Healthy Lung Meditation, which combines ancient Chinese meditation Qi Gong with Tai Chi movement to strengthen people’s immune systems. and strengthen their lungs to fight the Coronavirus COVID-19 and its new variants.

Currently, there are approximately 50,000 new infections every day in the United States and over 500,000 new cases worldwide. YiChen Master emphasizes the importance of improving people’s immune systems and strengthening their lungs to fight coronavirus. “This virus can mutate much faster than we can produce the vaccine for it. Even those who are vaccinated could still be infected with the new super-contagious variant Omicron, “said YiChen Master,” it is important for people to strengthen their own immune systems and the functionality of their lungs rather than completely relying on vaccines. . “

Due to the risk of cross infection in public fitness facilities and the quarantine restriction in hospitals, many people have lost the means to exercise to improve or recover. YiChen Master has developed this new Qian Yuan Healthy Lung meditation specifically for people to practice at home or in hospital. “This Qian Yuan Healthy Lung meditation combines several traditional Chinese meditation methods with more than two thousand years of history in practice,” YiChen said, “it can be safely performed at home or in hospital during the period. quarantine to help people strengthen their immune systems and strengthen their lungs for healthy recovery.

According to YiChen Master’s introduction, this lung health meditation uses the technique of microcosmic orbit breathing to strengthen people’s lungs and cultivate the flow of energy (Qi) along the microcosmic orbit within the body. human body. “Many people have died due to breathing difficulties or blood clots caused by the virus,” said YiChen Master. “This meditation on healthy lungs can help people strengthen their breathing capacity and improve energy flow and blood circulation within the body to reduce the risk of blood clots which caused many deaths during this time. pandemic.”

As more and more groundbreaking cases for vaccinated people have been reported, YiChen Master wants to educate people about the benefits of meditation, in addition to other precautions and treatments, to fight the COVID-19 coronavirus and its news. variants. “This healthy lung meditation can help people improve their immune systems and strengthen their lungs to fight this deadly and contagious virus. It can also reduce the side effects of vaccines that many people have after getting vaccinated. YiChen Master said, “Meditation has been shown to improve the general state of health of people as well as reduce stress and depression levels.

The Qian Yuan Health Lung Meditation introductory video is available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/oPrEU3_N2ig. It is recommended that people practice once or twice a day for 15 minutes each time, or whenever people experience difficulty breathing or chest pain. Professional medical treatment is strongly recommended if the symptom persists.

For more information on Qian Yuan Healthy Lung Meditation, please visit the website at http://HealthyLungMeditation.org.

About YiChen Master

YiChen Master has over 30 years of experience practicing meditation and has developed the new Healthy Lung Meditation method to help people improve their immune systems and strengthen their lungs to fight COVID-19 and its variants.

Master YiChen
Dayspring Meditation Center
+1 385-888-6888
YiChenMaster@gmail.com


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A moving meditation on mortality in the late paintings of Brice Marden http://www.kundalini-support.com/a-moving-meditation-on-mortality-in-the-late-paintings-of-brice-marden/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 22:05:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/a-moving-meditation-on-mortality-in-the-late-paintings-of-brice-marden/ Brice Marden’s recent paintings and drawings are provisional, tender, heartbreaking, angry, vulnerable and open. As his job requires him to engage the surface with gestures, pressures and movements – which has been true since the start of his career – this ties in with what he can accomplish physically. Thinking back to the career of […]]]>


Brice Marden’s recent paintings and drawings are provisional, tender, heartbreaking, angry, vulnerable and open. As his job requires him to engage the surface with gestures, pressures and movements – which has been true since the start of his career – this ties in with what he can accomplish physically. Thinking back to the career of this eminent artist, I see three fundamental periods. In the first, which ran from 1964 to the mid-1980s, he worked in a monochromatic fashion and was known for the thoroughness of his attention to the surface and the palpable but elusive color he could achieve with the encaustic. There was an unmistakable physicality in his muted paintings, a tension between the expressive and the sober.

In the second period he rethought the way he used line and the way he painted, and swapped the subtle tactility of the encaustic for diluted oil and drawing in what he told me. once described as “dirty turpentine”. This period was inspired by his window designs for Basel Cathedral; his travels in North Africa, where he became interested in Islamic architecture in Fez and Marrakech; a trip to Thailand, where he started collecting seashells, especially scrolls, and made layered designs loosely based on their brands; and by the exhibition Masters of Japanese Calligraphy, 8th-19th century, at the Japan House Gallery and Asia Society, New York (October 4, 1984 – January 6, 1985).

In his paintings of this time, he would go back into the looped lines and, using a razor blade, make sure the edges were straight and clean. The lines were flat and gracefully displaced, reminiscent of Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings without resembling them in any way. I never thought that Marden thought it necessary to get rid of the past or quote it. He believed that it was possible to move forward without adhering to these well-known choices, and time has proven him to be right.

Installation view of Brice Marden: These paintings are by themselves at Gagosian in New York (© 2021 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever. Courtesy of Gagosian)

While Marden’s meticulousness and definitive visual statements characterize the first two periods, the third, or what I consider his late period, reveals an artist who knows change is inevitable, mortality draws near, and death draws near. art is not a bulwark against time. . This awareness of the passage of time has had a major effect on his work and, I will risk, on his psyche.

I estimate this late period began around 2016-17, when he made 10 paintings measuring 8 by 6 feet, using 10 different brands of earth green oil paint; each painting was done in one of the brands, with the paint applied in successive layers. The process was gradual, restricted, and, as with his previous work, carefully thought out with regard to its parameters. At the time, Marden was almost 80 years old.

Marden applied a thin wash of one of the green earths over the entire surface. He then measured a horizontal line, resulting in a square on top, tightly filling the top of the vertical format, while leaving a wide stripe along the bottom. This compositional structure appears to have been inspired by the proportions of a vertical sketchbook he was using at the time. Then he filled the square with successive coats of slow-drying wet paint, allowing thin streams of color to drip from the lower edge of the square into the strip below, like ragged string. By dividing the canvas into two uneven areas and covering the surface with a strict monochrome, Marden limited his control over the painting’s imagery and gave up his ability to determine what happened in the broadband ci below.

Marden chose green earth (also known as “green earth”), knowing that Botticelli used it as an undercoat of his subject’s flesh in works such as “Idealized Portrait of a Lady” (tempera à l’œuf, 1480), where he glances through the translucent skin of the figure. Known as one of the most permanent pigments of all, it evokes both wet moss and rot.

Brice Marden, “Prelude” (2011–21), oil and graphite on linen, 96 x 72 inches (© 2021 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Bill Jacobson Studio. Courtesy permission from Gagosian)

For Marden, color is never just color; it is connected to nature, light and alchemy. It seems to me that no one has yet delved into all the ways that color signifies and resonates in his work, from his reference to the sunlight shining through a grove of olive trees to the trinity of colors he has used. in his works for Basel Cathedral. .

Here are some of the thoughts, memories and feelings that came to my mind shortly after sitting on a bench in the main gallery of the exhibition. Brice Marden: These paintings are by themselves, in Gagosian (November 13-December 23, 2021), but as I looked at the work, another line of thought began to crystallize.

In the late 1980s, following his interest in calligraphy, Marden began working on Cold mountain, a series of black and white paintings, drawings and prints inspired by his reading of the legendary Chinese hermit poet Han Shan, translated by Red Pine. In an interview with the painter Pat Steir who appeared in the brochure accompanying these works in the exhibition Brice Marden: Cold mountain, to Dia Chelsea (October 17, 1991 – May 31, 1992), Marden said:

At first I made drawings using the shape that poems take in Chinese, then I started to combine picture and calligraphy, using the shape of the poem as a skeleton. I am more and more interested in the ideas of Tao and Zen. Cold Mountain’s poems speak a lot about this.

Later he said:

It is not a form of writing. I am not try to make a language.

I don’t think Marden is I was trying to create a language, but looking at the paintings and drawings I started to think that there was an asemic element in these works that should not be ignored. This is especially true of the “Chalk” paint (oil, charcoal, and graphite on linen, 96 x 72 inches, 2013-21), which seems to have turned everything Marden has done before into something fresh – to both calm, accepting, and exposed.

Brice Marden, “Chalk” (2013–21), oil, charcoal and graphite on linen, 96 x 72 inches (© 2021 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Bill Jacobson Studio. With l ‘kind permission from Gagosian)

Using the same proportions he chose for his green earth paintings, Marden outlined a 6-by-6-foot square, leaving a two-foot strip below. He then divided the square into a grid of 225 squares, using a pencil, so that it rested on the tape. The palette at the top of the painting consists of sandstone red, Chinese red, and ghostly white, while the lower band is a mustard yellow infused with green – obliquely complementary colors. The group also arouses associations with Chinese scroll painting, in which the work is mounted on yellow silk.

In each square of the grid, Marden used white to make a rounded shape, sometimes as an open line and other times a halved shape, which evokes nature (i.e. rocks) and linguistic signs. The grid can also be read like a graph, but of what? Evoking chalk (title of the painting), the pale white lines suggest an indecipherable language, a recording of which one can only guess the meaning, as well as a state of impermanence. On this grid of white and organic shapes, he drew a series of lines in red and white paint. One of the white lines seems to define the silhouette of a character. (How do you read it?) The other white lines are used to partially cover a red line, sometimes painted wet in wet, so that they take on a particular shade. Some of the red runs along the greenish band.

“Chalk” is a layered painting or palimpsest in which Marden brings together different materials – graphite, pencil, and oil paint – and two monochrome patterns, with additional markings and lines over the larger area. Contrary to his penchant for control, which was certainly a hallmark of monochromatic paintings and later works, such as the six-panel painting “The Auspicious Garden of the Flat Image, Third Version” (2000-6), in the collection of MoMA, Marden lets go from the green earth rooms. His use of asemic signs recognizes that we cannot say everything in language, and that part of our experience remains indecipherable. And yet, knowing this, he does not come to the same void twice; he never transforms this inability to write unfinished language into a theme or a variation. Every painting is different. By his earlier standards, these works are unfinished and dependent on the artist’s aging body.

Installation view of Brice Marden: These paintings are by themselves at Gagosian in New York (© 2021 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever. Courtesy of Gagosian)

In his interview with Steir, Marden acknowledged the role played by time, its effect on the body, and he made no attempt to take refuge in the style:

I’m 5 ‘8 ½ ”, and I weigh that much, and I’m left-handed, and I’m of a certain age. It has a great effect on the appearance of a thing. The kind of brand that I can do physically.

The Tao teaches the adept to let go of his expectations and to live here and now. When Marden continues the vertical row of marks on the far right of a design, even as the ink runs out, he does not replenish the ink but registers himself as it disappears. The signs he is making may not be decipherable, but they spoke directly to my heart. They are the diary of an aging man living in time, while conveying his love for certain places and curiosities. I think they are some of the most open and moving paintings and drawings that Marden has done in his already rich career.

Brice Marden: These paintings are by themselves continues in Gagosian (541 West 24th Street, Chelsea, Manhattan) until December 23.

Located in New York’s Hudson Valley, students have immediate access to the Hessel Museum of Art and the CCS Bard Library and Archives. Apply before February 1, 2022.


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Carla Acevedo-Yates, Mari Carmen Ramírez and Tobias Ostrander will lead the sections and programs of the fair next year.


It is the first major performing arts venue in New York to require proof of third vaccination.


Hundreds of sets, costume and paper facsimiles of Dickinson’s writings were donated to museums.



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Meditation: key to reducing pressure from society http://www.kundalini-support.com/meditation-key-to-reducing-pressure-from-society/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 14:15:56 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/meditation-key-to-reducing-pressure-from-society/ Views of the publication: 203 Over the years, life becomes even more dynamic. Jobs are more diverse, working hours are arduous and daily tasks even more complicated. In this tiring cycle, we are becoming more stressed than ever. What makes it worse is that we can’t find the time to relax with how our routines […]]]>

Views of the publication: 203

Over the years, life becomes even more dynamic. Jobs are more diverse, working hours are arduous and daily tasks even more complicated. In this tiring cycle, we are becoming more stressed than ever. What makes it worse is that we can’t find the time to relax with how our routines are loaded. The company collectively has run on its heels, and it is not known when it will have time to stop. Taking time to go to the park for a walk was the perfect weekend activity, but most people find it difficult to break free from their schedules. Society needs a solution that is not overly demanding in these stressful times, but gives you the relief you need. What society needs is meditation. Click Pharmacy has always made helping people better manage their physical and mental health a priority. There is no such correct solution to solving the problem as meditation.

What is meditation ?

Most people think of meditation as just sitting alone in a room and waiting for time to pass. However, the practice is much more complex than that. It takes your mind on a complicated journey in which you disengage from the ideals of the world around you. It teaches your brain to be present and to switch off anyway. This makes meditation more than appropriate for overwhelmed individuals in today’s society.

What are the types of meditation?

Meditation can be one size fits all, but it can also be a subjective matter for everyone. You can start with basic mantra-level meditation and move on to more complex or diverse types. Different types of practices help people cope with different problems. Here are some of the popular styles that you are likely to come across

Guided meditation

As the name suggests, guided meditation generally requires that you have an instructor to guide you through the session. With guided meditation, you try to bring images to mind. They are usually images of people, places or objects that bring you comfort. The concept is to tap into the receptivity of your senses and use that energy to focus on the mental image.

Guided meditation can be practiced every day for a relaxing break.

Mindfulness meditation

Mindfulness meditation does the opposite of guided meditation. Instead of escaping, you focus on the situation. You inhale and exhale, taking into account where you are, your surroundings and what you are doing at the moment. It is a practice that helps you feel grounded and in motion with your surroundings.

Tai chi

Tai chi has recently gained in popularity. It combines the movements of martial arts with the principles of meditation. This involves going slowly through martial arts style poses while maintaining a constant breathing rate. It adapts your muscles to help your mind focus.

Transcendental meditation

Transcendental mediation is the most commonly recognized idea. The technique is simple and easy to follow. It doesn’t have any stringent requirements. What you need to do is breathe and repeat a mantra to yourself. It can be a custom phrase, word, or phrase that gives you contentment and helps you relax. Your body transcends itself into a state of relaxation and comfort. Since you are exercising too much, it is quite easy for most people to start and continue.

What are the benefits of meditation for society?

The benefits of meditation are more than numerous. They’re not just about improving mental health; in fact, even your physical health increases when you meditate regularly. Here are some of the benefits you will get from it.

Better sleep

Meditation allows you to do what our imbalanced work and life schedules don’t. Meditation calms the mind and relaxes the muscles, which makes it easier to sleep. This is a claim that research has verified. So, if you suffer from insomnia or feel too tired to fall asleep, try meditating before bed.

Better heart health

Meditation has the potential to lower your blood pressure and help you cope with heart disease. Studies have shown that people with heart disease who meditate regularly have experienced improvements like a decrease in the thickness of the artery walls. They are important markers, and anyone with a history of heart disease can do good with them.

Reduced anxiety

Meditation helps to cope with problems like anxiety and depression. It helps the chemicals in your brain to find balance. Over-thinking and worrying are habits that increase when your brain isn’t resting. With meditation, you take the breaks you need and your system has time to recuperate instead of dwelling on just one thing. Meditation also tends to improve specific PMS physical symptoms, including pain and fluid retention, and menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats.

Better memory

Since meditation often involves remembering images or situations and focusing intensely on certain things, it can improve our memory. It keeps the hippocampus in focus, where memories are formed, and helps us retain them better.

Last word

Meditation is not a concept for monks. It’s something anyone can do, and they should! It takes your stress away and helps you deal with stress in ways you never thought possible. So if you are having trouble keeping up with the hustle and bustle of life today, practice meditation.

Meditation also tends to improve specific PMS physical symptoms, including pain and fluid retention, and menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats.


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Live Well: Colorado Springs Meditation Class for Parents and Kids | Way of life http://www.kundalini-support.com/live-well-colorado-springs-meditation-class-for-parents-and-kids-way-of-life/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/live-well-colorado-springs-meditation-class-for-parents-and-kids-way-of-life/ Meditation is not only beneficial for adults. Steffany Butts-Boucher saw firsthand how a calm and peaceful environment can have a noticeable effect on children. When the meditation teacher, who has an education background, took on the interim leadership of a charter school in Colorado, she wondered how to adjust the culture and give children limits. […]]]>

Meditation is not only beneficial for adults.

Steffany Butts-Boucher saw firsthand how a calm and peaceful environment can have a noticeable effect on children. When the meditation teacher, who has an education background, took on the interim leadership of a charter school in Colorado, she wondered how to adjust the culture and give children limits. After introducing a period of silent reading in the morning, the difference in children was palpable.

“It’s interesting how much setting the tone really changed the entire structure of their space and their day, and how they felt throughout the day,” said Butts-Boucher, owner of the Echo. Healing Arts Studio in Manitou Springs.

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With that in mind, she and Erin Gocinski, an art teacher at Manitou Springs High School, who also teaches mindfulness to her students, created Treehouse Meditation for parents and kids. The one hour practice is intended to help children learn how their minds work and how their breathing can affect the way they feel. The classroom can also help manage stress and develop mindfulness and empathy, and serves to connect parent and child.

Ten minute meditations are interspersed with periods of play, to help with short attention spans and also as an alternative means of working on mindfulness. Children as young as 3 or 4 can learn to meditate, although the class is typically aimed at first-graders and up, said Butts-Boucher. She leaves it up to parents to decide if their child is ready.

The course is on Sundays at the Kreuser Gallery. Participants must bring water, a yoga mat and blankets or pillows.

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“We call it treehouse because it connects with childhood and the idea of ​​playing, as well as a time to connect with oneself,” said Butts-Boucher. “Treehouses are places where the imagination can soar, but they are also a calming place for children, where they have their own space. It is a practice to climb into a space.

The class begins with treehouse breathing, where children can learn and express how their bodies feel when they breathe in particular patterns. It is followed by a rhythmic walking meditation, which differs from the walking meditation usually practiced by adults, with slow steps and a mantra. In this case, the participants make applause movements and take steps or movements related to the sound patterns. This is followed by a hopscotch meditation, where children and parents will jump to stations around the room and do different body movements or activities. A final nest and heartbeat meditation concludes the lesson, with parents and children creating a nest of blankets and pillows and resting together to anchor themselves.

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By offering a range of activities, kids and parents can choose what they like and can keep doing outside of class.

“Meditation deepens children’s connection with others,” said Butts-Boucher. “It can improve sleep in adults and children, and improve concentration and attention span.”

Contact the author: 636-0270

Contact the author: 636-0270


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One Night Only Experiential Performance by Alicia Keys interweaving music, meditation, movement, art and technology at http://www.kundalini-support.com/one-night-only-experiential-performance-by-alicia-keys-interweaving-music-meditation-movement-art-and-technology-at/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.kundalini-support.com/one-night-only-experiential-performance-by-alicia-keys-interweaving-music-meditation-movement-art-and-technology-at/ Hosted by Superblue, Therme Art and neurotechnology pioneer MindMaze, a secret party marked the launch of a new series of MYND experiential programs, designed to reveal how the arts can promote well-being in body and mind. (The Magazine Plus Editorial): – Miami, Florida, December 2, 2021 (Issuewire.com) – Last night at a special one-night-only event […]]]>

Hosted by Superblue, Therme Art and neurotechnology pioneer MindMaze, a secret party marked the launch of a new series of MYND experiential programs, designed to reveal how the arts can promote well-being in body and mind.

(The Magazine Plus Editorial): – Miami, Florida, December 2, 2021 (Issuewire.com) – Last night at a special one-night-only event hosted by Superblue, Spa art, and pioneer of neurotechnology MindMaze, Alicia Keys led over 600 guests through an immersive guided meditation and musical performance at Superblue Miami. Known for her timeless songs, witty musicality and activism, the 15-time Grammy®-winning singer / songwriter / producer has always focused on elevating her audience and has increasingly focused on performance. mental health and meditation in his personal and professional life.

Presented during Miami Art Week, Secret eveningée presented MYND Experiences, a new series of neuroscience-based experiential programs developed as part of Therme’s joint venture with MindMaze, exploring how neurotechnology can be used in art, architecture, design and music to create dynamic environments that advance mental and physical well-being. The next program in the series will be a multi-sensory musical experience based on this performance and incorporating MYND technology, launched at Superblue Miami in 2022.

Secret eveningée open at 7 p.m., with guests invited to explore Meadow by DRIFT, an interactive upside-down landscape of hanging mechanical flowers that perpetually bloom in a symbiotic response to the movement of the people below. Keys led a guided audiovisual meditation session corresponding to the installation, using rhythm and sound to align body and mind with the environment and bringing participants to a deeper state of consciousness.

At the end of the session, guests moved into a second installation in Superblue by art collective teamLab, where a set of responsive artwork –Flowers and people, cannot be controlled but live together – transcending borders, A whole year per hour, intertwined with Universe of water particles, transcending borders –animates perception while exploring the concepts of time and the relationship between individuals and their environment. In this space, Keys performed live, enveloping guests in a multisensory experience. The 75-minute set, including new music from his upcoming album KEYS (released December 10), created a dynamic interaction between the artist and the artwork by teamLab, with each movement of Keys being affected and superimposed by the projections of the artwork.

The evening also included remarks from the event’s organizers, including Mikolaj Sekutowicz, CEO and Curator of Therme Art, Mollie Dent-Brocklehurst, CEO and Co-Founder of Superblue, and Tej Tadi, Founder and CEO of MindMaze.

“Throughout my life, I’ve always wanted to push the boundaries and make music that exposes the deep connection we have with each other! The arts always make you see the world with new eyes, ”said singer-songwriter Alicia Keys. “This one-night-only show was a beautiful demonstration of how the arts and wellness can come together to foster deeper awareness and explosive pleasure at the same time. I am delighted to collaborate with Therme Art, MindMaze and Superblue and participate in the launch of such a revolutionary initiative as MYND Experiences.

“Combining meditation, sound, visuals and neurotechnology, Alicia’s performance last night created a 720-degree experience infusing and encompassing the senses for the participants. The gathering launched a new program of MYND experiences, designed to spark awareness and discourse on how we can create healing spaces through visual arts, architecture and cultural engagement, ”said said the CEO and co-founder of Therme Art. Mikolaj Sekutowicz. “Therme Group is dedicated to a focus on personal well-being, and we are delighted to partner with artist, creator and mental health protagonist Alicia Keys, leader of MindMaze neuroscience and pioneer of Superblue experiential art to produce holistic experiences. “

Tej Tadi, Founder and CEO of MindMaze said, “The interactive and adaptive environment created by Alicia’s immersive meditation session and musical performance embodies the multimodal platforms that MindMaze is dedicated to developing for the improvement of our collective mental health. Our launch of the “MYND” Experiences with Therme Art at Superblue Miami reflects our shared ambition to create cultural experiences, spaces and resources that advance a holistic approach to improving mental wellness on a global scale. “

Co-founder and CEO of Superblue Mollie Dent Brocklehurst added: “Secret eveningThe activation of DRIFT and teamLab’s installations at Superblue created a vibrant audiovisual environment rooted in these artists’ messages about creating harmonious and healthy relationships between themselves and the world around us. Superblue’s mission is to amplify the role artists play in our well-being as individuals and as a society, and we are delighted to continue our collaborations with Therme Art and MindMaze.


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